Talk:Washboard

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WikiProject Musical Instruments (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
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WikiProject Percussion (Rated Start-class)
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Question[edit]

There's something I wanted to understand, which after reading this article I still don't get: How did people, before washing machines, use washboards to clean clothes? What, does it scrape dirt off or something? How is using a washboard better than just putting clothes in soapy water?

They are still sold in immigrant communities in the United States.K8 fan 22:59, 14 February 2007 (UTC)

read this then: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laundry

Further documentation of the Cajun frottoir[edit]

I have no experience editing pages, but have some information I think would enrich the topic of musical washboards.

I just returned from Louisiana cajun country where I picked up a washboard from Tee Don Landry who has carried on the process of frottoir production that he learned from his father, Willie Landry. Willie was the metalworker who met Clifton and Cleveland Chenier and made what is likely the first frottoir, based on a design Clifton drew in the dirt. I spent an hour with Tee Don at his home on May 7, 2007 listening to his recollection of this history, and observing the shop where he carries on the tradition of handmade frottoirs.

Further documentation of these events can be found on Tee Don's website at [1]. From there, you can also follow the link to [2], which not only details this history, but also describes and documents the acceptance of 2 of Tee Don's rubboards into the Smithsonian's collection. On this link, further links are referenced that provide additional documenting sources.

Finally, I would also recommend including one of New Orlean's contemporary musicians in this article. Washboard Chaz is a highly respected artist in the New Orleans area, and a repeat performer at the New Orleans Jazz Fest. The Washboard Chaz Trio includes a harmonica player and exceptionally talented blues guitar player of the Mississipi blues tradition. What makes him of added interest to an article on musical washboards is the fact that he makes great music utilizing the simple laundry-style washboard, as demonstrated on his website, [3]

I hope this info will be useful to someone with more experience editing Wikipedia pages.

Tongatim 07:15, 25 May 2007 (UTC)