Talk:Wattmeter

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Should include some information about Hall effect power sensors as seen here: http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/vol_2/chpt_12/3.html. Efadae (talk) 18:29, 7 April 2009 (UTC)

used for measuring power[edit]

wattmeter: it is an instrument used for measuring power. 203.128.19.4 19:48, 16 August 2006 (UTC)ADEEL ZUNAIR

digital electronic wattmeter/energy meter[edit]

This article has a lot of overlap with the Electricity meter article. That article has a lot of content. This article is barely more than a stub, and quite out of date.

A modern digital electronic wattmeter/energy meter samples the voltage and current thousands of times a second. The average of the instantaneous voltage multiplied by the current is the true power. The true power divided by the apparent Volt-Amps (VA) is the Power Factor. A computer circuit uses the sampled values to calculate RMS Voltage, RMS Current, VA, Power (Watts), Power Factor, and Kilowatt-Hours. The simple models display that information on LCD. More sophisticated models retain the information over an extended period of time, and can transmit it to field equipment or a central location.

There are currently (June 2007) two cheap digital models for consumers in the US: P4400 Kill A Watt by P3, and the EM100, for about $30. More expensive models are more accurate and/or have more features, such as using a price for electricity to compute and display the cost of using an applicance being measured/tested over a period of time.

Measuring RF power is an important but somewhat separate topic. It should be covered in this article, and/or linked to elsewhere.

The article should also discuss instruments meant for monitoring line-voltage loads (most common) vs. general-purpose instruments that cover a wider range of voltages and frequencies. -69.87.199.53 21:45, 12 June 2007 (UTC)

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Ranging[edit]

" If the pressure coil has range of 300 volts, the half of it can be used so that the range becomes 150 volts."

Using half of it halves the ampturns per amp, thus doubling the FSD current & thus voltage. 82.31.66.207 (talk) 10:37, 10 May 2014 (UTC)