Talk:Wayland the Smith

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Norse history and culture (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Norse history and culture, a WikiProject related to all activities of the Norse people, both in Scandinavia and abroad, prior to the formation of the Kalmar Union in 1397. If you would like to participate, you can edit the article attached to this page, or visit the project page, where you can join the project and/or contribute to the discussion.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Middle Ages (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Middle Ages, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of the Middle Ages on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Mythology / Norse mythology  (Rated Start-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is supported by WikiProject Mythology. This project provides a central approach to Mythology-related subjects on Wikipedia. Please participate by editing the article, and help us assess and improve articles to good and 1.0 standards, or visit the WikiProject page for more details.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by the Norse mythology work group.
 

Swords[edit]

"Caliburn, in Mary Stewart's Arthurian Legend, is the sword of Macsen, Merlin, and Arther." Well, yes: but does Mary Stewart ever say that Caliburn was forged by Wayland? Does anyone? If so, please provide a citation! —Preceding unsigned comment added by 87.114.17.129 (talk) 18:30, 28 January 2011 (UTC)

From a redirect[edit]

from Wayland Smith, which now redirects to Weyland:

"He was the son of a sailor and a mermaid and is King of the Elves. He has two brothers. One is named Egil, also a smith.
In France he is known as Gallans, in Germany as Wieland, and in Norse Legend as Volund or Volundr."

Moved here because I can't verify most of it—specifically, the part about his family and his French name (Google is no help, and there are no links to fr:Gallans). —No-One Jones 21:59, 8 May 2004 (UTC)

Similar names[edit]

The_Master_and_Margarita has a character with a noticeably similiar name. Any connection?

the character Waylon Smithers, from the animated TV show "The Simpsons", may be named in reference to Weyland Smithy or the "Fables" character of a similar name.

Article title[edit]

So far as I can see, the current title, "Wayland Smith" isn't attested by either reference, and isn't the most common name, in general. Wouldn't either Wayland the Smith or simply Wayland be more logical? Alai 03:12, 17 August 2007 (UTC)

I did some googling before I requested it be moved. Wayland Smith appears to be a well-attested name[1], and IMHO it is both common and unambiguous. However, I'd personally prefer just Wayland.--Berig 16:08, 17 August 2007 (UTC)
But neither reference, so there's a total disjunct between the title, and the contents of the article. Your google search includes hits like this on the first page, and other such variations. I certainly don't think it's the most common term, raw google results aside. I'd have no objection to Wayland or Weyland (one redirects here, one is a disambig, just to confuse matters). Alai 05:01, 19 August 2007 (UTC)

Cognate with Vulcan?[edit]

A quick google adds some credence to my impression that Vulcan and Weyland are cognate and culturally equivalent. Is this a common belief, or just what the eccentrics are saying? If I knew better I'd edit a section in. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Steewi (talkcontribs) 03:48, 12 November 2007 (UTC)

"Wayland's assistant is Flibbertigibbet"[edit]

I've never heard that before and there's no citation. In the Flibbertigibbet article, the same assertion appears, citing... this article! Should Wikipedia really be citing itself for something it's got no external reference for? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.133.37.81 (talk) 17:20, 10 September 2008 (UTC)

I agree. I'll add the fact template to both articles and it should be removed if no source can be found. A supernatural meaning certainly existed around 1600 (e.g. in A Declaration of Egregious Popish Impostures 1603, & King Lear), but that's quite a distance from Anglo-Saxon mythology. Indeed Wiktionary call this a Middle English word, first attested in 1450. I get the impression there are no detailed English sources on Wayland either, so it would be surprising if they listed a sidekick. ☸ Moilleadóir 16:28, 29 November 2008 (UTC)

Rape?[edit]

I don't agree with the references to Weyland's rape of Bodvild. The texts seem to suggest that she was seduced, not raped. There are references to them as "lovers" and their "lust" which do not imply rape to me. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.10.91.104 (talk) 17:45, 6 April 2011 (UTC)


This happens a lot in myth studies, people seem almost eager to make things more dark and questionable. Nut it does not help that there are multiple versions and that some mythologies like greek were pretty rape filled. That all said I thought they got together willingly as well.

65.183.214.150 (talk)

In Modern Fiction[edit]

The reference to cartoon character Waylon Smithers is pure speculation. This character has a wiki page, where it is referenced that the name Waylon came from the puppeteer Wayland Flowers. There is no evidence offered for any link between Wayland the Smith and the cartoon. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Wayo231 (talkcontribs) 21:11, 9 January 2013 (UTC)

I've removed the reference to the Weyland-Yutani Company from the Alien franchise, as there wasn't any explanation for any sort of connection. Iapetus (talk) 15:29, 17 January 2013 (UTC)