Talk:Wheel of Fortune (U.S. game show)

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Auditions[edit]

Someone added this text to the Jeopardy! audition process article; but it should definitely go here instead (if verified).

Wheel of Fortune audition process
A similar audition process is used for Wheel of Fortune. Instead of taking a 50-question test, potential contestants are given a 16-puzzle test divided into four categories with some letters revealed (similar to the program's bonus round). The contestants have 5 minutes to solve as many puzzles as they can by writing in the correct letters. A passing score is considered to be 12 out of 16 but like Jeopardy!, exact scores are never given. The people who pass stay for a while to compete in a mock version of the game using a miniature wheel and a puzzleboard.

Cheers,--Aervanath (talk) 13:37, 4 September 2010 (UTC)

Source: [[1]] This verifies everything but the "A passing score" sentence. JTRH (talk) 14:03, 4 September 2010 (UTC)
Added it. Us441(talk)(contribs) 10:54, 8 September 2010 (UTC)

NBC's brief cancellation of the show in 1980[edit]

I think the Randy West-sourced statement about the daytime show's brief cancellation in 1980 is incorrect. I've read (but don't remember where just now) that Silverman reversed the decision to cancel it because it was NBC's highest-rated daytime show (or at least game show), not because the decision was made to cut the Letterman show from 90 minutes to 60. The Letterman show was 90 minutes when it premiered, and was cut to an hour after it had been on the air for several weeks. The shows that were cancelled to make room for Letterman (in the 90-minute format) were Card Sharks, Hollywood Squares, and the second NBC version of High Rollers. I can't disprove Randy's statement without more research, so I'm going to leave it for now, but it may be subject to change in the future if I can source it. JTRH (talk) 21:05, 27 June 2011 (UTC)

For the record, while I know this is seven months after the fact, Wheel was poised for cancellation twice in 1980 – while the first was being among the candidates to be ousted for Letterman (an idea dismissed by May), the second was followed through to the point of a series finale being taped for August 1. As I understand it, Silverman realized that Letterman was struggling as a 90-minute series and hence it was chopped down on August 4. (The cancellation announcement was why Charlie O'Donnell was replaced by Jack Clark, as the former left to do another series.) Also, Randy West is/was friends with and has myriad connections in the game show industry – he, Fred Wostbrock, and Roger Dobkowitz are among the most knowledgeable and trustworthy people in the genre. -Daniel Benfield (talk) 03:23, 15 January 2012 (UTC)

Biggest wins and losses on Wheel of Fortune[edit]

The page "Biggest wins and losses on Wheel of Fortune" has been moved to "Talk:Wheel of Fortune (U.S. game show)/Biggest wins and losses" in order to preserve history of this article. Graeme Bartlett (talk) 01:34, 23 August 2011 (UTC)

Current information[edit]

This article makes no sense. Obviously Pat Sajak has been the host of what people know as the Wheel of Fortune for a very long time. If I were an alien I would have no idea of that reading this article. This makes it sound like he quit as the host in the 1980s. The caption for one of the pictures even says Sajak and White have hosted the syndicated version since 1983 yet there is no link to a page for the syndicated version. Which makes no sense because nobody give a sh** about any version of Wheel of Fortune that doesn't have Pat Sajak and Vanna White hosting it. So if the one currently airing is technically the syndicated one then this article should be ABOUT the syndicated show with whatever came on before being relegated to a footnote. Honestly, I think this is vandalism. Will somebody please fix this? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 98.230.1.159 (talk) 04:49, 2 October 2013 (UTC)

This is hardly vandalism. The network daytime version (1975-1991) used to be the subject of a separate article which was merged into this one. Sajak left the daytime show in 1989 but has been on the nighttime version throughout its run. Yes, the current show is the syndicated one, as is made clear within the first few sentences of the article, and the overwhelming majority of the information in the article is about the current version. 32.179.50.207 (talk) 10:29, 2 October 2013 (UTC)

The show is still on the air. Need current host information. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 70.109.56.32 (talk) 00:19, 6 December 2011 (UTC)

Move?[edit]

The following discussion is an archived discussion of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on the talk page. No further edits should be made to this section.

The result of the move request was: not moved -- JHunterJ (talk) 01:11, 26 April 2012 (UTC)


Wheel of Fortune (U.S. game show)Wheel of Fortune (US game show) – Like Wheel of Fortune (UK game show), punctuations for the US may not be necessary. WP:article titles does not either favor or oppose inclusion of punctuations. Nevertheless, I thought typing in "U.S." is not as convenient as "US". To be fair, I wonder how others feel about this. --George Ho (talk) 20:38, 18 April 2012 (UTC)

  • Oppose. See MOS:ABBR. "U.S." is not at all analogous with "UK". In American English, which this article is obviously written in, it is acceptable to use either "US" or "U.S.", as long as it is done consistently. Personally, I prefer "US" (and so does CMoS), but our current practice is not to change between the two unless there is a very compelling reason (similar to ENGVAR) and I do not see one in this case. Lastly, why have you piped links to WP:IAR and WP:CONSENSUS? They have nothing to do with what you've written. Jenks24 (talk) 20:49, 18 April 2012 (UTC)
    • I piped WP:IAR because WP:article titles is not the same as WP:MOSABBR, mainly used for body editing, not title editing. I don't see anything in WP:MOSABBR related to naming conventions of titles. WP:article titles could favor either titles, but I don't see punctuation-related in that policy; the abbreviation guideline doesn't mention how titles must be. Also, I've re-edited piping of and piped WP:Consensus in sentences because I invite consensus to see this and would like others to read more about them. --George Ho (talk) 20:58, 18 April 2012 (UTC)
      • If you don't think the MoS applies, then surely it doesn't need to be IAR'd anyway? Your consensus link does make more sense now, though. Of course the MoS applies to titles – it would be absurd to use "U.S." in the body, but "US" in the title (or vice versa). As a more concrete example, MOS:DASH does not explicitly mention article titles, yet it is regularly used as a rationale to move (or not move) articles. Jenks24 (talk) 21:06, 18 April 2012 (UTC)
        • Oops... Found this: WP:MOSABBR#Acronyms and initialisms as disambiguators. I guess I didn't see that. Still, that guideline doesn't imply that one or the other be favored or opposed. It says: either this (or that). Favorism or opposition of punctuations on abbreviations as disambiguators is not suggested there. --George Ho (talk) 21:12, 18 April 2012 (UTC)
          • Yes, that's what I've been saying. Either is acceptable and we just stick with whatever the original editor chose. Jenks24 (talk) 21:20, 18 April 2012 (UTC)
  • Oppose:"U.S." with periods is used on other game show articles including The Price Is Right, Sale of the Century, Who Wants to Be a Millionaire, and Wheel of Fortune. JTRH (talk) 21:27, 18 April 2012 (UTC)
  • Support. In an international encyclopedia such as Wikipedia we try for commonality (see WP:COMMONALITY, part of WP:MOS). The modern tendency is to avoid the use of periods in such abbreviations as "UK" and "US". Even the hugely dominant US style guide Chicago Manual of Style now recommends "US". From the current edition, CMOS16 (my underlining):

10.4 Periods with abbreviations
In using periods with abbreviations, Chicago recommends the following general guidelines in nontechnical settings. For the use of space between elements ...
...
3. Use no periods with abbreviations that appear in full capitals, whether two letters or more and even if lowercase letters appear within the abbreviation: VP, CEO, MA, MD, PhD, UK, US, NY, IL (but see rule 4).
4. In publications using traditional state abbreviations, use periods to abbreviate United States and its states and territories: U.S., N.Y., Ill. Note, however, that Chicago recommends using the two-letter postal codes (and therefore US) wherever abbreviations are used; see 10.28. ...

See also the abbreviations section in WP:MOS, which makes specific mention of the provincial usage "U.S." in the US. Given the problem of parallel articles like Wheel of Fortune (US game show) and Wheel of Fortune (UK game show), it would serve the interests of the encyclopedia and its readership if we could break free of it. The firmly applied principle of uniformity within an article gives no support for lack of uniformity between articles.
NoeticaTea? 01:55, 19 April 2012 (UTC)
Yes, I noted in my oppose that CMoS has flipped its position in the latest edition. It's worth noting that since the latest edition of CMoS there have been discussions at WT:MOS about deprecating "U.S.", but the consensus has always been that either is acceptable. Your COMMONALITY point is reasonable, but I would argue that it's more important for this article to be in line with other members of, say, Category:American game shows, than with British shows that are based on the American one. Jenks24 (talk) 15:11, 19 April 2012 (UTC)
  • Support - Agree with the concerns by Noetica and George Ho, we must avoid abbreviations for U.S. and we strive for commonality. Darth Sjones23 (talk - contributions) 02:12, 19 April 2012 (UTC)
    • You mean "punctuations", not "abbreviations"? --George Ho (talk) 02:22, 19 April 2012 (UTC)
  • Oppose per Jenks24 and JTRH. Steam5 (talk) 07:56, 19 April 2012 (UTC)
Comment: WP policy also allows for use of national variations according to subject, e.g., articles about the United States are generally written in the style of United States English and articles about the United Kingdom are generally written in the style of British English. If "U.S." with periods is the dominant self-referent usage in the United States (as the MOS states that it is) and "UK" without periods is the dominant self-referent usage in the United Kingdom, there's no reason not to use each as appropriate. Striving for "commonality" may actually introduce inaccuracy - a pet peeve of mine, for example, is that the infobox templates for game shows require the use of UK-English credit terms of "presenter" and "narrator" when the terms used in the United States are "host" and "announcer." Calling Drew Carey the "presenter" of The Price Is Right is inaccurate. He's not the "presenter," he's the "host." But "commonality" means he must be inaccurately referred to by the term that's used on British television? National variations exist and accuracy requires them to be portrayed here. JTRH (talk) 14:47, 19 April 2012 (UTC)
  • Oppose, based on conventions following national varieties of English. The periods are the dominant form in the United States. There is no need to create consistency where it does not exist. The same rationale goes for changing "UK" to "U.K.", which exists in numerous American print sources.--Jiang (talk) 22:34, 19 April 2012 (UTC)
  • Oppose WP:ENGVAR, and American English has not become as lax as British English in the degeneration of usage of fullstops. (though the lack of spaces between the fullstop and the next letter has become common) 70.49.124.147 (talk) 04:23, 20 April 2012 (UTC)
  • Oppose per WP:ENGVAR and because "US" looks like an English word in all-caps rather than an abbreviation. There's a reason Brits moved to "UK" more readily... because their period-less abbreviation is unambiguous. Powers T 02:58, 22 April 2012 (UTC)
The above discussion is preserved as an archive of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on this talk page. No further edits should be made to this section.

Duplication/triplication[edit]

Some of the information in this article is given two or three times, including the dates of the network runs and personnel changes. It needs a major copy edit which I don't have time to do right now. JTRH (talk) 10:11, 26 July 2012 (UTC)

  • Most of the repetition I see is just the intro repeating what's found in the article. Which is how it's supposed to be. Ten Pound Hammer(What did I screw up now?) 04:18, 29 July 2012 (UTC)

Move[edit]

The following discussion is an archived discussion of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on the talk page. Editors desiring to contest the closing decision should consider a move review. No further edits should be made to this section.

The result of the move request was: No consensus Orlady (talk) 23:53, 15 August 2012 (UTC)


Wheel of Fortune (U.S. game show)Wheel of Fortune (game show) – Okay, I will concede a.) that CBS had an unrelated game show in 1952 also called Wheel of Fortune, and b.) the US is not the only country whose version of the famous hangman/roulette game is called Wheel of Fortune.

However, in regards to Point A, a show that's been consistently on the air for 37 years and is still in first-run clearly gets priority over something that was only around for a few months in TV's infancy. In regards to Point B, all of the international versions are derivations of the American version. Would it not make sense that the original, American verison be at just "(game show)" since all other shows bearing that title (save for the 1952 CBS show) are derivations of the American version? This seems like a pretty clear cut WP:PRIMARYTOPIC to me. Ten Pound Hammer(What did I screw up now?) 21:46, 1 August 2012 (UTC)

The above discussion is preserved as an archive of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on this talk page or in a move review. No further edits should be made to this section.

37 years but 30th anniversary?[edit]

They don't acknowledge the Chuck Woolery years? Bizzybody (talk) 00:43, 30 October 2012 (UTC)

The current version of the show doesn't count the daytime version as part of its history. The nighttime show is in its 30th season. JTRH (talk) 01:13, 30 October 2012 (UTC)

picture of set[edit]

The picture of the set is really outdated, could someone possibly find a picture of the current set.207.224.196.27 (talk) 03:08, 26 January 2013 (UTC)


Good Grief thousands of characters about such trivial crap — Preceding unsigned comment added by 8.225.200.133 (talk) 19:32, 1 June 2013 (UTC)

GA Review[edit]

Toolbox

See WP:DEADREF
for dead URLs

This review is transcluded from Talk:Wheel of Fortune (U.S. game show)/GA1. The edit link for this section can be used to add comments to the review.

Reviewer: Khazar2 (talk · contribs) 23:15, 8 June 2013 (UTC)

I'll be glad to take this review. Initial comments to follow in the next 1-3 days. Thanks in advance for your work on this one! -- Khazar2 (talk) 23:15, 8 June 2013 (UTC)

Initial comments[edit]

On first pass, this looks like solid work; thanks again for your time on this one. I only have a few quibbles here so far, found below.

  • "After discussing the idea with Merv Griffin Enterprises staff, they thought" -- this seems like it might be a dangling modifier, unless I'm misunderstanding who "they" is here. Perhaps "After Griffin discussed the idea with his staff, they thought"?
  • "apart of off-network syndication" -- should this be "a part of"? Or "apart from"? I'm not quite following this sentence.
  • "current" -- per WP:WTW (under criterion 1b): "Prefer specific statements of time to general ones. Don't say, "Recently, public opinion has turned against Senator Smith." Instead say, "A Gallup poll in June 2013 showed that Senator Smith's approval rating had dropped 7 percent since January." When material in an article may become out of date, follow the Wikipedia:As of guideline"

This article has a few points you might rewrite under this guideline:

  • " Amanda Stern is the current producer,"
  • "The production is currently designed by Renee Hoss-Johnson"
  • "Frankie Blue and John Hoke wrote the program's current theme"
  • "Thus far throughout the 30th season"
  • " most often in the present television season." (this also probably needs a citation) -- Khazar2 (talk) 01:48, 9 June 2013 (UTC)

Checklist[edit]

Rate Attribute Review Comment
1. Well-written:
1a. the prose is clear and concise, it respects copyright laws, and the spelling and grammar are correct. Tiny grammar point above. Spotchecks show no evidence of copyright issues.
1b. it complies with the manual of style guidelines for lead sections, layout, words to watch, fiction, and list incorporation. See minor WTW points above.
2. Verifiable with no original research:
2a. it contains a list of all references (sources of information), presented in accordance with the layout style guideline.
2b. it provides in-line citations from reliable sources for direct quotations, statistics, published opinion, counter-intuitive or controversial statements that are challenged or likely to be challenged, and contentious material relating to living persons—science-based articles should follow the scientific citation guidelines. Some sections of the article are unsourced, but I believe everything this criterion requires to be sourced, is. Randy West's website seems questionable as a reliable source, but again, the claims that it supports don't seem to be the sort that require citations for GA anyway.
2c. it contains no original research.
3. Broad in its coverage:
3a. it addresses the main aspects of the topic. Looking at a few other web sources on Wheel of Fortune history, I don't see anything important left out.
3b. it stays focused on the topic without going into unnecessary detail (see summary style).
4. Neutral: it represents viewpoints fairly and without bias, giving due weight to each.
5. Stable: it does not change significantly from day to day because of an ongoing edit war or content dispute.
6. Illustrated, if possible, by images:
6a. images are tagged with their copyright status, and valid fair use rationales are provided for non-free content.
6b. images are relevant to the topic, and have suitable captions. Infobox image needs a caption ("Title card for Wheel of Fortune Season 30"?)
7. Overall assessment. Pass as GA
  • Took care of most of the "current"isms and all other issues. Ten Pound Hammer(What did I screw up now?) 03:25, 9 June 2013 (UTC)
  • Thanks for the quick responses. Looks almost ready to go, but one more "current"ism needs to be addressed, the "Thus far throughout the 30th season," It looks like this stat dates to November 2012, and this week's Nielsen (which is linked to) actually shows Wheel in 3rd place. Is there a way to check a quarterly or yearly report that could replace the "thus far"? -- Khazar2 (talk) 11:27, 9 June 2013 (UTC)
  • Not sure where to find a more longterm source, but I've appended it. Ten Pound Hammer(What did I screw up now?) 13:10, 9 June 2013 (UTC)
  • Perhaps this claim simply needs to be removed? It concerns me that we've gone from "regularly placed second" to "regularly placed third"; next week the statistic may change again, and the language here doesn't really address the ephemeral nature of this statistic. I'm also not sure what the source is for "Wheel came in second place in syndication behind first-place finisher Judge Judy in the 29th season (2011–12)", but I'm not particularly good at reading TV ratings figures, so I apologize if I'm just missing this. -- Khazar2 (talk) 13:17, 9 June 2013 (UTC)
  • I should have suggested this on the previous version anyway, but particularly now that it's so short-- would you be amenable to removing the two subsection headers here? Per WP:LAYOUT (also part of criterion 1b), "Very short or very long sections and subsections in an article look cluttered and inhibit the flow of the prose.". I think these two paragraphs would be self-explanatory under the header "Reception" without subheads. If you're up for that, this should be good to go. Let me know your thoughts, and thanks again for the fast responses. -- Khazar2 (talk) 21:23, 9 June 2013 (UTC)

Citation needed tag[edit]

Re: the citation needed tag added yesterday with the edit summary "a GA with unsourced parts?": my understanding per WP:GAC? is that the only statements requiring inline citation are "direct quotations, statistics, published opinion, counter-intuitive or controversial statements that are challenged or likely to be challenged, and contentious material relating to living persons". WP:GACN goes to to specify, "Inline citations are not decorative elements, and GA does not have any "one citation per sentence" or "one citation per paragraph" rules." I won't revert the tag that's in place, but thought I'd explain my own reasoning. I'll leave it to the regular editors of the article from here. Cheers, -- Khazar2 (talk) 10:52, 10 June 2013 (UTC)

How do we watch the show?[edit]

P — Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.223.230.131 (talk) 02:14, 24 September 2013 (UTC)

  • Wheeloffortune.com has a section where you can enter your zip code and find the nearest network that airs it. Ten Pound Hammer(What did I screw up now?) 22:53, 24 September 2013 (UTC)

[edit]

The file in the infobox is outdated the current season is no longer WOF's 30th year. Tom the Bergeron (talk) 20:15, 20 October 2013 (UTC)