Talk:White County, Tennessee

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Yert![edit]

Is this vandalism? What is the deal with this? I don't see much on google about it, but there are a few people who come up both saying they are from white county and saying "Yert!" Is this a local fad for youth or a true slang term?

If it is true, it needs to be more clearly labelled in the text. Tfine80 00:23, 1 October 2005 (UTC)

I will certainly verify that, as a native White Countian, the word "yert" is a common expression used among all ages of people here. They say that if you go anywhere in the world, and you hear "yert", you instantly know that another White Countian is near.
My grandfather used to tell us the tale (not sure if it is true or not) that during World War II he was walking on a dock in San Diego towards his Coast Guard ship. He heard somebody yelling "yert!" at the top of their lungs. He looked around and soon discovered a man standing on the deck of a nearby vessel who he had attended high school with.
And I'll do my best to clean up the mention a bit. Danthemankhan 19:30, 24 October 2005 (UTC)
That's a great story. Very interesting! Tfine80 21:45, 24 October 2005 (UTC)

if you aint from around here..[edit]

then Yert! don't make no sense. Yert! has been around for many generations. My grandmother remembers saying it when she was a kid back in the 30's. not sure of the origin people in surrounding counties don't get it either... it's unique to White County, very unique. It's not limited to youth either... it can even be heard in the City and County meetings as people arrive, local barber shop, diners, in traffic, etc.

question/correction[edit]

where in the heck did William Wrigley Jr. - chewing gum industrialist come from on the White County page??? I can find no record of any wrigley ever mentioned in White County. Anybody got info on this??? may be bogus...

William Wrigley Jr. had a summer house up on Bon Air Mountain before World War II. He spent quite a lot of time there (so the story goes) and the County named a road up there Spearmint Lane after him. Presumably the one he had his house on. He also donated money to the local school to build a baseball field (which no longer exists). His family also built Wrigley Field in Chicago. Some interesting facts you might not have known. Danthemankhan(talk)Flag of the United States.svg 19:14, 21 November 2005 (UTC)

...nope, sure didn't know that. very neat... that brings to mind, need some info on here about Bon Air Springs resort also. and the Bon Air mine and train...

Doyle in the city section[edit]

How can Doyle be listed as a city with a population of only 525? Does TN not classify cities as those over X population? On the Doyle, Tennessee page it is listed as a town. -- JohnCub 22:46, 22 February 2007 (UTC)