Talk:William Waldorf Astor, 1st Viscount Astor

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Untitled[edit]

I've edited the links to Astor II III etc to their titles as that's how they were most known. If someone thinks that the II II needs mentioning then do so but a note would be best as it really confuses matters when you have one son listed by III and another by his title (baron hever~). Hopefully it's now more consistent Alci12 13:46, 14 June 2006 (UTC)

The statement that the Astor viscountcy was hereditary while the barony was not is false. Baronies were the lowest-ranking of the hereditary peers. The first Lord Astor's son was a Tory politician of considerable ambition, and he is said to have been angry when the father accepted the barony, which, when eventually inherited, would have removed the son from the House of Commons, as in fact the inheritance of the later viscountcy did. I have deleted the statement.

The matter is dealt with by Christopher Sykes in his biography of Lady Astor, Nancy. (London, 1972) —Preceding unsigned comment added by Samhook (talkcontribs) 19:52, 24 May 2009 (UTC)

Move Request[edit]