Talk:Wood shingle

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Untitled[edit]

I think it would be nice if this article were to start with a concise paragraph defining what a wood shingle is.

Erland Lewin 10:12, 1 March 2006 (UTC)

probably. In lieu of that I linked to "roof shingle" which I think is a start. Also I added the worldview template -- I don't know enough about this to put it in a global context, but clearly this isn't. aaronrp 02:13, 21 March 2007 (UTC)

I remember corrogated wood surface shingles being on the side of my house and several others in my neighborhood as I was growing up in a suburb of Buffalo, NY. Are these not also wood shingles? Or did somebody just errantly tell me that's what they were called? Point is, shingles are more than just for roofs. (matter of fact, the shingles on our roof are asphalt.) Joe (talk) 03:00, 30 December 2008 (UTC)

Proposed merge[edit]

The following discussion is closed. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section. A summary of the conclusions reached follows.
The result of this discussion was to Merge. NukeofEarl (talk) 17:14, 24 September 2014 (UTC)

I can see no real difference between this article (Wood shingle) and Shake (shingle). I suggest the latter article is merged here. Any other views? Richard New Forest (talk) 21:07, 26 July 2011 (UTC)

There seems to be a distinct difference between them: 'shakes' are made from split wood, 'wooden shingles' are made from cut wood. This is what is says in article Shake (shingle). In article Wood shingle this distinction was not clearly mentioned. I added it today with reference to article 'shake'. It all needs to be verified. If difference is clearly mentioned it may be useful to merge them. I am not sure, though. --VanBurenen (talk) 09:35, 26 October 2011 (UTC)
Agreed they should be merged, discussing of course any variants in type and name (split vs. cut etc.) --Macrakis (talk) 13:56, 26 October 2011 (UTC)
Support with concerns. These are really different articles, addressing two very similar products, with some common material. Both clearly need additional development. They are very closely related but discussing two topics in one article can be difficult to do without slighting one or the other. I have added WikiProjects to both articles; I would like to see some input by project editors.SBaker43 (talk) 03:22, 4 December 2011 (UTC)
Support. I do not have a sense of Wikipedia's management desire to have larger numbers of articles or grouping similar concepts into one article. Shakes and shingles are very similar, the only differences being shakes are split and left rough on at least one side and are thicker. Before machines came into use to cut shingles (19th century) they were all split and hand dressed and there was no need for a distinction between the two types. Much of the information in these two articles will be the same. The distinction currently in the articles that shingles are cut is a modern definition and does not take a historical view but is accurate for modern usage and should be clarified in this regard. Jim Derby (talk) 10:44, 9 February 2013 (UTC)
Support. These are very similar products, from the same material and used in the same way. On Norwegian stave churches for instance, wood shingle (machine made) is now used were shake shingle was used in the past - so these products are regarded as basically the same, so for instance this picture from Borgund church commons:File:Borgund dach.jpg. In Norwegian it appears that there is in fact only one word ("takspon"), literally "roof woodchips", indicating that Norwegian carpenters regard these as the same thing. The more important distinction is with regard to "weatherboard (or clapboard) roofs", roofs covered by long weatherboards commons:File:Hut in Seurasaari.jpg - if parallel to the roof ridge weatherboard roofs looks like an upside down boat commons:File:WikingBootshaus.jpg. --Erik den yngre (talk) 17:54, 6 October 2013 (UTC)

The above discussion is closed. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section.


Scandinavia[edit]

The claim that wood shingle was "the most common" roof cover in rural Scandinavia until the 1950s seems odd. Perhaps that is true for some districts on Sweden and even in East Norway, but as a general description it seems misleading. I think sod roof was more common (at least in Norway), various types of slate has been widely used, particularly during the last 100-200 years. Regards --Erik den yngre (talk) 12:22, 6 October 2013 (UTC)