Talk:Word play

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Incolomity[edit]

What on earth is "A incolomity " ???

Apronym[edit]

I think apronym is not identical to aptronym. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Apronym -- 217.184.104.13 17:21, 11 Feb 2005 (UTC)

Confusing[edit]

Word play is a literary technique in which the nature of the words used themselves become part of the subject of the work.--suggests that word play only exists where the words are the *subject* rather than the *medium*.

All writers engage in word play to some extent--contradicts this.

James Joyce--whose Ulysses, and even more so, his Finnegans Wake, are filled with brilliant writing and brilliant word play--and this is just flagrantly POV.

LogicalDash
Barbara Shack 14:56, 21 March 2006 (UTC)The words can be the subject As well as the medium.
Barbara Shack 16:40, 22 )I had to put David in as well. Having only a woman displaying herself is Politically Incorrect.

I don't think the Joyce bit is POV. You just need a citation, as virtually every scholar will agree on this. Anyway, even if you think there's no way this isn't POV, we must tell people that Joyce's word play is the focus of Finnegans Wake much more than any other book ever written ( until then ). --187.54.98.138 (talk) 20:45, 8 October 2010 (UTC)

Pictures[edit]

Removed the pictures, I think the picture of the woman was added to graffiti this page and appears to be a recent addition. There was nothing in the article or the description of the picture that showed this was a "play on words" except that the person who ADDED the picture MADE a play on words. If this picture is considered the best example of a word play for this page, it needs to be clearly explained. Yes, artwork certainly has a place here on Wiki, on pages that are relevant. I don't think the picture had any relevance to this article. Denaar 13:33, 23 March 2006 (UTC)

Overuse[edit]

A google search for the term "foil music" does not turn up any use of the term by critics, so the following comments violate Wikipedia NPOV guidelines:

Overuse of wordplay can occur to mask a lack of actual creativty or wit. For example, one might name their "Rap" music as "foil" music (wrap instead of wrap, then foil) to make themselves appear witty.

Canon 21:15, 17 May 2006 (UTC)

Chicken & kitchen[edit]

What is the name of the words like chicken <-> kitchen? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 210.245.110.63 (talkcontribs) 20 November 2007

I think it's called a metathesis, like when people pronounce "ask" as "axe".Keith Galveston (talk) 07:23, 5 February 2008 (UTC)

See also section[edit]

Doesn't anybody feel that the "see also" section is way too long? If there are no objections, I would like to make it into an independent list.

Keith Galveston (talk) 07:24, 5 February 2008 (UTC)

This has been tried before, but a lot of the entries were left out, so it was reverted. I think it is a good idea as long as the resulting list is at least as long as the current list. Preferably it would be even longer. Canon (talk) 12:06, 5 February 2008 (UTC)
Done. I'm going to improve the article ASAP, which at present is just a copy from the origianl article. Any thoughts on the article itself or on the title of the article is welcomed. Keith Galveston ~sign your posts on the talk page!~ (talk) 09:10, 9 February 2008 (UTC)

What does this sentence mean[edit]

"The Hungarian term for wordplay, occasionally used in the circle for its diaeres is Szójáték." What's "diaeres"? What does "in the circle" mean? What exactly does this sentence mean? More importantly, what makes it important to include a translation for wordplay in Hungarian only? Keith Galveston (talk) 14:26, 22 February 2008 (UTC)

Word play or Wordplay[edit]

I've looked up some dictionaries and found out that Oxford English Dictionary as well as Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary list that the form "wordplay" in their book as a headword for the term. I'm not suggesting a move of this article, but I really should think that form deserves to be added in the article. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Davidmjeong926 (talkcontribs) 07:14, 4 February 2010 (UTC)