Talk:Wordmark

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lawinfo.com[edit]

I have moved the lawinfo.com link to Logotype.

Wikipedia a wordmark?[edit]

Is Wikipedia's logo really a wordmark? Its logo usually comes with the puzzle globe and the text. --Abdull (talk) 12:56, 20 November 2009 (UTC)

Move request[edit]

The following discussion is an archived discussion of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on the talk page. No further edits should be made to this section.

The result of the move request was: moved, request is uncontested ~~ GB fan ~~ 15:55, 18 September 2010 (UTC)



Wordmark (graphic identity)Wordmark — Seems to be unnecessary parentheses. --The Evil IP address (talk) 12:47, 11 September 2010 (UTC)

The above discussion is preserved as an archive of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on this talk page. No further edits should be made to this section.

Public domain[edit]

The info pages of all three sample wordmarks used in this article (Coca-Cola, Google, Government of Canada) say: "It does not meet the threshold of originality needed for copyright protection, and is therefore in the public domain." I'm curious, as this article states "In the United States and European Union, a wordmark may be registered, making it a protected intellectual property." how can a protected intellectual property be public domain? The public domain article literally says "Works in the public domain are those whose intellectual property rights have expired, have been forfeited, or are inapplicable." --82.136.210.153 (talk) 21:13, 12 September 2014 (UTC)