Talk:Wyandot people

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject Oklahoma (Rated B-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Oklahoma, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of the U.S. state of Oklahoma on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

This article has comments here.

WikiProject Indigenous peoples of North America (Rated B-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Indigenous peoples of North America, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Native Americans, Aboriginal peoples, and related indigenous peoples of North America on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 

This article has comments here.

WikiProject Canada / Ontario / History (Rated B-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Canada, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Canada on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by WikiProject Ontario.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by WikiProject History of Canada.
 
WikiProject Ethnic groups (Rated B-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Ethnic groups, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of articles relating to ethnic groups, nationalities, and other cultural identities on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
 

This article has comments here.

This article has an assessment summary page.

Iroquois of the Haudenosaunee[edit]

Correct me if I'm wrong, I think the terms Iroquois and Haudenosaunee are interchangeable, so it's tautology to write "Iroquois of the Haudenosaunee" — Preceding unsigned comment added by 138.73.8.227 (talk) 19:36, 23 March 2013 (UTC)

Clans or tribes?[edit]

"The Petun nation, the tribes who lived around Georgian Bay in southern-central Ontario, were further divided into Bear, Cord, Deer, and Rock tribes." - it seems to me based on what I know of the Iroquois proper that these would have been *clans*, not tribes, but I am certainly no expert... Anyone got a reference? Brianski 21:24, 30 November 2005 (UTC)

The history of these people is complex and hard to summarize in a short encyclopedia article. There is a very good analysis of the interrelationships of the languages and tribes in the article by John Steckley, which I added as a source. Briefly, these people were beaten by the Anishinabek to the North, the Iroquois (Hadenosaunee) to the south and east, the French and then the English. The English and Iroquois pretty well finished them off. Many were assimilated by the Iroquois, others were displaced to the east (Quebec) and south (Kansas and Oklahoma).
Note that Steckley says that it is unclear as to whether the Bear, Rock, Cord and Deer were clans, moitees or tribes. He uses "tribes," so I went with that. Sunray 07:45, 2003 Dec 8 (UTC)
Oh, heh, yeah I read that article just a few minutes ago, before I saw your response. Since it talks about a Huron "Bear tribe" I must be wrong. Nevermind me :)! Brianski 21:51, 30 November 2005 (UTC)

Wyandots in 18th century Ohio country[edit]

Discussion relating to Colonel William Crawford and the Crawford expedition moved to Talk:William Crawford (soldier)

Meaning of Hure[edit]

"the name referred to a hure, the rough-haired head of wild boars". Hure also means the nose of the boars. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 70.82.36.55 (talkcontribs) , 21 February 2006

Origins of the word 'Huron'[edit]

The article states that it was Gabrielle Lalemant who proposed that the word originated in the French 'hure'. I think you will find that in the Relation of 1639, it is Jérôme Lalemant who writes of a French soldier seeing the hair fashion of a Wendat: ‘[T]his fashion of wearing the hair making their heads look to him like those of boars [hures], led him to call these barbarians “Hurons;” and this is the name that has clung to them ever since.’ (Reuben Gold Thwaites, 'The Jesuit Relations and Allied Documents.' Vol. 16, pp 229 - 231.

You are probably right. This online source speaks of three different Lalemant working for the Jesuit order.
http://www.wyandot.org/lalemant.htm
The three could have easily been mixed up. I originally wrote "Father Lalemant". Someone must have added the first name later on. We would have to look at the article's revision history. For sure however, it is Gabriel and not Gabrielle. The first is masculin, the second feminin. :-) -- Mathieugp

Tobacco[edit]

Re: removal of growing tobacco text -- I think tobacco was grown that far north, but I can't remember the source of info offhand. Tobacco was grown in England in the 1600s, brought from the New World, until the practice was outlawed for the benefit of Virginia. If I remember, I'll look for a source when I have better acccess. Pfly 03:11, 30 September 2006 (UTC)

Toujours les Hurons[edit]

There is high probability that the Frenchman's reference to the boar-like appearance of these Indians was directly related to their hair. The first Indians observed by the Missionaries and settlers were often scouts that commonly were engaged in hand-to-hand skirmishes. As a matter of protection, long hair was a liability. The cropped stripe down the middle was proof of virility without the easy grab. Dixonsnt 22:19, 27 May 2007 (UTC)

Image; Hairdress[edit]

The article could use some paintings or photos of the Wyandot. A magazine I read in the 1960's showed Wyandot warriors wearing hairdresses made of stag antlers. Did the artist invent this or does it have a historical factual basis? Das Baz, aka Erudil 19:12, 5 January 2009 (UTC)

I agree that the article, like many others, would be improved by the presence of images, but why do they have to be images of stereotypical romantic "warrior" or "shaman" figures from the past? The Wyandot are a living culture, personally I'd like to see images that capture the Wyandot people and places as they exist today. cheers Deconstructhis (talk) 20:57, 5 January 2009 (UTC)

Okay, let's compromise. Let's have images both of the old Wyandot, shamans and warriors, and the modern Wyandot, as they are today. Das Baz, aka Erudil 21:21, 6 January 2009 (UTC)

Algonquin or Iroquois?[edit]

I studied that they were the only Algonquin non Iroquoian farming group on the st. Lawrence river Zakster22` (talk) 20:11, 17 December 2009 (UTC)

You evidently misunderstood or have confused Hurons/Wyandots with a different group. —Kevin Myers 21:27, 21 December 2009 (UTC)

Disambiguation[edit]

Should there also be a Wyandot (disambiguation) page to list all the articles with this or similar names (Wyandotte)? Ruhrfisch ><>°° 03:13, 28 January 2010 (UTC)

Primary source[edit]

The following was dropped into the middle of the article. Perhaps a more knowledgeable editor can integrate it into the article?

Death Notice from the State's Advocate, Milton Pennsylvania published 8 February 1827"Died - at Upper Sandusky, on Tuesday the 2nd of January, the celebrated Chief of the Wyandot Nation, BETWEEN-THE-LOGS. He was eminent for his eloquence and the conspicuous relation he held to the Nation as their Chief Speaker. He lived and died a friend to the American government. He was the first that embraced religion among his brethren and the nation: from his firm piety he was appointed leader and afterward exhorter in the Methodist E. Church, in each of these, as every other station, he filled with dignity and faithfulness. He died in full triumph of the Christian faith and with his last breath declared the goodness of God." {State's Advocate 8 February 1827}

-Uyvsdi (talk) 06:30, 30 April 2013 (UTC)Uyvsdi

Move discussion in progress[edit]

There is a move discussion in progress on Talk:Chipewyan people which affects this page. Please participate on that page and not in this talk page section. Thank you. —RMCD bot 09:30, 12 March 2014 (UTC)

Move discussion in progress[edit]

There is a move discussion in progress on Talk:Cayuga people which affects this page. Please participate on that page and not in this talk page section. Thank you. —RMCD bot 18:44, 13 March 2014 (UTC)