Talk:Xerox

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Put back deleted info?[edit]

It seems on June 1st 2006, User:212.219.94.65 deleted a lot of information without reason, such as an Office Paper section. I suggest putting some of this back. - Jazzmaphone

Yes, I agree. Seems odd in the entire article, not a word about Joe Wilson. It mentions other less important CEOs. What is going on? AlexFeldman (talk) 11:17, 26 September 2013 (UTC)

Huge cleanup[edit]

I've performed a huge cleanup on this article, removing POV, restoring some old information and adding a lot of new information. Now the article needs more photos, and references. Anyone interested in helping? — Wackymacs 17:23, 13 July 2006 (UTC)

In my opinion, the article still contains strong POV and still reads like a commercial presentation. Thanks for your effort, but we need to do more. 1) Read the section on the economic doldrums of Xerox between 1980 and 2002-- it's practically missing. 2) The section on the poor accounting practices a half-decade ago reads like it's intended to excuse, not explain with NPOV. 3) The overall article reads like a brochure intended to court investment and instill confidence that Xerox has never done wrong and always grown. Sethnessatwikipedia (talk) 02:18, 6 May 2008 (UTC)

I did another cleanup - I guess seven years isn't bad. Mostly I reorganized the text that was there, trying to put it in some logical order. I added a paragraph about the Xerox tower and made some minor tweaks. See my comment under "Office Products Division" - there's a serious shortage of hard info that can be found on the web. Peter Flass (talk) 00:34, 2 November 2013 (UTC)

First laser printer[edit]

The article states that the first commercially available laser printer was the 9700 in 1977, but IBM had the 3800 available in 1976. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Luckydog429 (talkcontribs) 04:47, 15 January 2012 (UTC)

I found a reference that mentions the 1200 as the first commercial laser printer. Peter Flass (talk) 00:29, 2 November 2013 (UTC)

John Carrol became a backer, later spreading the company throughout North America.[edit]

What does this fragment mean? --78.43.58.163 (talk) 14:10, 5 April 2012 (UTC)

It's not a fragment and seems like plain English to me. Powers T 21:44, 7 April 2012 (UTC)

Ford Escape Xerox[edit]

The article includes a picture of a 'Ford Escape Xerox', but there is no accompanying text describing what it is or what the relationship is to the company. Does anyone have information about this? Tweisbach (talk) 08:29, 23 July 2012 (UTC)

The contributor, User:Bull-Doser, is a younger, self-described "automobile photographer". My belief is that he just stumbled across a service technician's SUV, photographed it at a distance, cropped the photo, and inserted it into the history section without considering its significance or whether a vehicle with a Xerox decal is actually historic. -- DanielPenfield (talk) 11:36, 23 July 2012 (UTC)
I agree with DanielPenfield therefore I removed it. Grahamboat (talk) 16:29, 22 September 2012 (UTC)

Move to Xerox Corporation[edit]

Xerox means photocopying so this article should be moved to Xerox Corporation and Xerox be turned into a disambiguation page. Cogiati (talk) 17:54, 20 October 2013 (UTC)

In fact I've never heard anyone using any other word for photocopying than xeroxing and even for xerox machines sold by other companies everyone calls them xerox machine by company x... e.g. a xerox machine by Canon. Cogiati (talk) 17:57, 20 October 2013 (UTC)
As noted above in an edit made in 2008, in the UK at least, and probably elsewhere, the use of Xerox to mean photocopying is unusual or rare. Here the term universally used is photocopying. However, that should not prevent Xerox being made into a re-direct to Photocopying and this article being re-named Xerox Corporation as proposed with a hat-note back to Photocopying.  Velella  Velella Talk   18:22, 20 October 2013 (UTC).
This is a fairly simple WP:ENGVAR issue - the whole world refers to the corporation as Xerox, but only part of the world uses Xerox as a verb. So the corporation should get the primary listing. It's not like the two are unrelated - given that the first paragraph of the corporation article links to photocopying, you could treat that paragraph as your disambiguation page. I'd leave it just as it is.86.29.247.123 (talk) 17:55, 21 July 2014 (UTC)
I would move the article, not because I think "xerox" means photocopying, but because "Xerox" isn't the company's name. An article about a corporation should be under that corporation's legal name, regardless of what people call it or what name it trades under. That's what disambiguation pages and redirects are for. J. D. Crutchfield | Talk 17:47, 15 October 2014 (UTC)

Office Products Division[edit]

The article mentions Rochester/Webster and PARC, but is missing anything on Don Massaro and the Office Products Division in Dallas which, I believe, built not only electronic typewriters but the Xerox personal computers. Xerox has about the worst case of corporate amnesia I've found, and there isn't a lot of material anywhere on this. Paul Strassman mentions OPD once or twice. Peter Flass (talk) 00:28, 2 November 2013 (UTC)

John Brooks article[edit]

This article from 1967 has some useful information on the early history of Xerox, the relationship with University of Rochester etc. 86.29.247.123 (talk) 17:32, 21 July 2014 (UTC)

Copying vs Duplicating?[edit]

The article says,

Xerox's first foray into duplicating, as distinct from copying, was with the Xerox 2400, introduced in 1966.

It doesn't explain, however, the distinction between copying and duplicating. For us laymen, that would be a useful explanation. I've always thought duplicating and copying were the same thing. J. D. Crutchfield | Talk 17:38, 15 October 2014 (UTC)

Researchers at Xerox and its PARC[edit]

The paragraph beginning "Researchers at Xerox and its PARC" is very badly written, researched, and cited. A better source for this information would be the books "Fumbling the Future" or "Dealers of Lightning." Among other problems:

- "technicians" is a pretty insulting English word for a delegation of software engineers and managers that included Steve Jobs and the engineers who created the Macintosh (via the Lisa). - Microsoft has a connection through Charles Simyoni, creator of the Xerox Alto Bravo word processor and Microsoft Word, but the particulars of the Windows OS user interface were derived indirectly from the Mac as filtered through Microsoft engineer's brains, not from Xerox. - the duopoly sentence is a ridiculously oversimplified opinion. - Is fool.com generally considered a credible source? It's an editorial financial site. It doesn't specialize in accuracy.

The person who posted the foregoing seems to know a good bit about the subject. Instead of anonymously pointing out errors, why not sign in and fix them? J. D. Crutchfield | Talk 15:49, 17 November 2014 (UTC)

Where is the paragraph about worldwide character substitution?[edit]

Xerox Workcentre devices all over the world are affected from a bug that does character substitution, found out by German David Kriesel. The bug lasted more than 8 years. When scanning on any quality mode (normal, high, higher; not affected in TIF mode), the JBIG2 algorithm causes perfectly layouted, repeatable character substitution. Recently Xerox published firmware updates for many Workcentre device families, however most devices won't be updated because of whatsoever causes (lazy update policy in businesses, low knowledge about the bug etc.) Public services, military, archives are affected as well.

I don't know whether it's better to link to the article(s) on dkriesel.com or to make a new paragraph. Also my English is not "encyclopedia-compatible". --79.248.31.53 (talk) 17:08, 2 January 2015 (UTC)

I added something. --Tobias (Talk) 02:47, 10 February 2015 (UTC)

Research Centers[edit]

Xerox has many research centers around the world, and they are barely mentioned in the article. There is Xerox Research Center Europe, Xerox Research Center India, Xerox Research Center Canada and Xerox Research Center Webster albeit PARC. Xerox Canada was mainly responsible for [innovations in the chemicals industry for ink production]. Research Centre Europe, for example, was initially in charge of the dynamic pricing strategy adopted in the parking zones of Los Angeles. IMHO, it would be useful to list and describe those other sites as well so people don't think there is only PARC out there. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 82.233.117.90 (talk) 19:33, 4 March 2015 (UTC)