Talk:Yarkovsky effect

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Anonymous[edit]

Don´t want to register myself, but the info in the text is wrong! Earth rotates prograde, so the hole physics change (momentum etc.). Even with right sources it is wrong! Shame!

Yarkovsky effect - Planetary bodies effected by sunlight[edit]

Regardless of the planetary body creating a different spin due to side of sun relative to the mass, as the object heats up from the sun, would there not be a burn off of any ice or gasses on the mass? Realistically, this would cause the mass to lose weight and thus gain speed. On top of that, atoms move faster at higher temperatures, would this not be relative to a larger object? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 96.50.110.140 (talk) 18:39, 28 May 2011 (UTC)