Talk:Yuppie

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Former good article nominee Yuppie was a good articles nominee, but did not meet the good article criteria at the time. There are suggestions below for improving the article. Once these issues have been addressed, the article can be renominated. Editors may also seek a reassessment of the decision if they believe there was a mistake.
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To describe Yuppies[edit]

Not all of them are white or of WASP origins, baby-boomer (that can include generation Xers) and urbanites from the east or west coasts. Nor the yuppies are selfish, neo-conservative, social liberal and obsessed with professionalism. I've heard of newer terms of BUPpies (Black Urban Professionals) and HUPs (Hispanic Urban Professionals), plus the Asian American image is usually of a yuppie one esp. in the urban areas of California known for university and hi-tech business operations in the then-launched booming web sites industry. + 71.102.11.193 (talk) 05:03, 22 May 2010 (UTC)

Although this article was nominated for deletion, the consensus was strongly in favor of keeping it. Loodog made the nomination, noting that it was a neologism. The arguments to keep, however were not particularly detailed or insightful, amounting basically to "It appears a lot, so it must be important". Unfortunately that conclusion does not assist in molding the article contents. What we're left with is a lot of people expressing their personal experience, backed with references to legitimize their perception. The article should be brief, not the heavy WP:SYNTHESIS that it is now. Also unpalatable, as you point out, is the very fuzzy definition of the word. Not just in identifying or isolating groups, but in the very concept that a particular person, of a particular color, of a particular age, of a particular political bias can be reduced to a label of a single word, where another person objectively cannot. "Yuppie" is highly subjective, politically correct, trendy verbiage. If a typical Wiki biographical article were to include the word, it would probably be struck as WP:PEACOCK or WP:BIAS. Note that in Wiki Advanced Search, it's very infrequently used in biographical articles. I'd be in favor of reducing this article to three or four sentences, including one that emphasizes the fuzzy nature of its usage. Regards, Piano non troppo (talk) 08:56, 22 May 2010 (UTC)

Burning Of Bombay Street[edit]

The 2011 BBC documentary "The Burning Of Bombay Street" has been cited by one Wiki user as containing evidence via graffiti on a wall in one scene that "yuppy" was in use in Belfast in 1969. The documentary actually contained much footage more recently filmed, Presenter Lawrence Pitkethly revisited the area with a BBC film crew, and any "yuppy" graffiti is from more recent years. From extensive reading and quoting of late 1960s Belfast newspapers for a study I did on "The Troubles" in 1997, I can say with confidence that the "yuppy" word was entirely absent. A word that was apparently emotive enough to inspire graffiti would surely not have been.

The Wiki user states that the graffiti refers to a desire for more social housing, not yuppy apartments, which is also a concern of more recent years.

(Solidsandie (talk) 02:14, 18 March 2011 (UTC))

Chicago Magazine May 1980[edit]

The claim that Chicago Magdazine was first purveyor of the "yuppie" word is unsubstantiated. The Wikipedia link beside the Chicago Magazine claim does not lead to a copy of the article. As an encyclopedia, I think we should remain impartial about this until a hard copy of the article becomes available somewhere. So far it is hearsay. The '80s web historian in the case linked to below is reserving judgement, and I believe that if we are to perform to professional encyclopedia standards, we should do the same. Please see link below:

http://www.80sactual.com/2009/10/yuppie.html

(Solidsandie (talk) 03:28, 27 April 2011 (UTC))so i let him go

fg

More about the Chicago Magazine 1980 claim[edit]

We've already covered the fact that Chicago Magazine claims that Dan Rottenberg had first printed use of the "yuppie" word in that magazine in may 1980. We also know that there is another claim to the coining of the word from Joseph Epstein in 1982. Once again, the Wiki article reverted to backing the Chicago Magazine claim, although the Chicago magazine article is nowhere to be found on-line. The only satisfactory proof would surely be a hard copy of the article from 1980? Until that appears, I request that Wikipedia continues to adopt a neutral stance, simply recording that the first appearance of the word is contested.

What we have at the moment is two sources claiming two different things. It is worth noting my own experience as a writer on all things '80s: I received an e-mail from a lady claiming to have spotted a very early usage of the "yuppie" word in an American soap opera. Close examination of the episode in question by myself revealed that the phrase used was "upwardly mobile", not yuppie! There does seem to be some confusion about these two phrases. "Upwardly mobile", of course, is of somewhat older vintage than Yuppie.

It is also worth noting the view of the Times (UK) newspaper on yuppies at the time of the 1987 stock market crash:

"I've lost my shirt today as well as the money of a lot of other guys," said one stereotype of the Yuppies who swarmed to the financial world to reap the benefits of the Reagan boom - http://www.80sactual.com/2009/10/1987-great-gale-and-stock-market-crash.html

Yuppies were generally seen as not only being "upwardly mobile", but anxious to take advantage of the opportunities offered them by the Reagan years.

I am actively seeking a genuine May 1980 copy of the Chicago Magazine article so that this controversy can be resolved once and for all. Until then, please can the Wiki article remain neutral? That would be the position of any other encyclopedia.

(Solidsandie (talk) 19:16, 5 August 2011 (UTC))

Connotation of the term?[edit]

The article briefly visits Yuppie being used as a negative term by people of lower income than the accused yuppies, but does not really clarify whether the term is pejorative or just purely descriptive and biased in that scenario. Can anybody expand on this, and update the article as such? Would anybody ever call themselves yuppies in a neutral or positive light, despite being somewhat self-flattering (describing oneself as upcoming). Any clarification here (or in the article) would be great. Thanks! Dataxpress (talk) 17:14, 15 November 2011 (UTC)

Spelling Mistake[edit]

If you actually pick up a dictionary book instead of just guessing you will see in dictionaries from the very early 1980's including the OED that it is actually yupe, meaning young urban professional employee. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.128.56.151 (talk) 22:33, 28 October 2013 (UTC)