Talk:Z-80 SoftCard

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Untitled[edit]

This seems to be written from a VERY odd point of view. It's not an NPOV problem, just person.

The claim above is a very interesting observation and one suspects might indeed win an award, if such were ever to be offered, for what might be the most (gloriously?) esoteric criticism ever made of any wikipedia article. (Ericross) —Preceding unsigned comment added by Ericross (talkcontribs) 11:42, August 27, 2007 (UTC)


I noticed a couple problems with this article that should be corrected:

1) "The SoftCard Legacy" section is pure opinion. It should be deleted.

If not, the following information needs to be corrected:

2) The failed successor to the Apple II was the Apple III (introduced by 1980). The Mac may be considered a successor to the Lisa. The II family went on to the //e, //c and IIgs sub-families, all of them largely regarded as home machines in a time business computing was synonymous to PC-compatibility.

3) the business legitimacy of the Apple II was not usually questioned. It was the first platform where Visicalc ran, effectively legitimizing personal computers as business tools. Rbanffy (talk) 15:17, 29 July 2009 (UTC)

  • I saw the same problems with the 'Legacy' section. I deleted it on sight due to: 1. No citations, pure opinion, and 2. Bad logic. The SoftCard was released 4 years prior to the Mac, so it is impossible for the SoftCard to mitigate any business-unfriendly aspects of the Mac. By the time the Mac was mainstream, CP/M was dead anyway. Mvdwege (talk) 04:56, 2 September 2009 (UTC)