Tamanishiki San'emon

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Tamanishiki San'emon
玉錦 三右衛門
Tamanishiki with The Emperor's Cup.jpg
Personal information
Born Yasuki Nishinouchi
(1903-12-15)December 15, 1903
Kōchi, Japan
Died December 4, 1938(1938-12-04) (aged 34)
Height 1.74 m (5 ft 8 12 in)
Weight 140 kg (310 lb)
Career
Stable Nishonoseki
Record 308-92-17-3draws (Makuuchi)
Debut January 1919
Highest rank Yokozuna (November 1932)
Retired December, 1938
Championships 9 (Makuuchi)
Gold Stars 1 (Miyagiyama)
* Up to date as of September 2007.

Tamanishiki San'emon (玉錦 三右衛門, December 15, 1903 – December 4, 1938) was a sumo wrestler from Kōchi, Japan. He was the sport's 32nd yokozuna. He won a total of nine top division yūshō or tournament championships from 1929 to 1936, and was the dominant wrestler in sumo until the emergence of Futabayama. He died whilst still an active wrestler.

Career[edit]

He joined Nishonoseki stable but the stable was very small at that time. Therefore, he often visited Dewanoumi stable and was trained by yokozuna Tochigiyama Moriya. He later became head coach of Nishonoseki stable whilst still active in the ring, and under his leadership the stable enjoyed one of its most successful periods in its history.

Tamanishiki won three consecutive championships from October 1930 to March 1931, but he wasn't promoted to yokozuna. In January 1932, the "Shunjuen-Incident" (春秋園事件, Shunjuen-Jiken) broke out.[1] The incident was the biggest walkout in sumo history. He was one of eleven top division wrestlers who remained in sumo[2] and became the first head of Rikishikai (力士会), or the association of active sumo wrestlers. He won his fifth top division championship in May 1932 and was finally awarded a yokozuna licence in November 1932. He was the first yokozuna in sumo since the retirement of Miyagiyama a year and a half earlier. His promotion was seen as a reward for staying with the Sumo Association and helping them through the Shunjuen incident.[3]

Tamanishiki often went to Tatsunami stable and trained wrestlers, such as later yokozuna Futabayama Sadaji. Tatsunami stable was small at that time, but the stable became stronger in the sumo world later on. Tamanishiki defeated Futabayama the first six times they met in competition, but he was never able to beat him again after Futabayama began his record winning run in 1936.

Tamanishiki was the first yokozuna to raise one leg high while performing yokozuna dohyō-iri (the yokozuna ring-entering ceremony). His style was said to have been beautiful and when Futabayama was promoted to yokozuna he emulated this style. This style is very popular now in yokozuna ceremonies.

In 1938, Tamanishiki died while an active sumo wrestler, following a delayed appendectomy.[4]

Career Record[edit]

  • In 1927 Tokyo and Osaka sumo merged and four tournaments a year in Tokyo and other locations began to be held.
Tamanishiki[5]
- Spring
Haru basho, varied
Summer
Natsu basho, varied
1919 (Maezumo) (Maezumo)
1920 (Maezumo) West Jonokuchi #14
4–1
 
1921 West Jonidan #16
3–2
 
West Sandanme #54
2–3
 
1922 West Jonidan #1
2–3
 
West Sandanme #43
3–1
1h

 
1923 East Sandanme #13
7–3
 
West Makushita #30
3–3
 
1924 East Makushita #24
4–1
 
West Makushita #3
4–2
 
1925 East Jūryō #11
5–1
 
East Jūryō #2
5–2
 
1926 West Maegashira #13
8–3
 
East Maegashira #6
5–6
 
- Spring
Haru basho, Tokyo
March
Sangatsu basho, varied
Summer
Natsu basho, Tokyo
October
Jūgatsu basho, varied
1927 West Maegashira #3
6–5
 
West Maegashira #3
6–4–1
West Maegashira #1
6–4–1
 
East Maegashira #1
6–4
1d

 
1928 East Komusubi
8–3
 
West Komusubi
6–4
1d

 
West Sekiwake
9–2
 
West Sekiwake
6–5
 
1929 East Sekiwake
10–1
 
East Sekiwake
9–2
 
East Sekiwake
9–2
 
East Sekiwake
7–4
 
1930 East Sekiwake
9–2
 
East Sekiwake
8–3
 
West Ōzeki
9–2
 
West Ōzeki
9–2
 
1931 East Ōzeki
9–2
 
East Ōzeki
10–1
 
West Ōzeki
8–3
 
West Ōzeki
9–2
 
1932 East Ōzeki
7–1
 
East Ōzeki
8–2
 
East Ōzeki
10–1
 
East Ōzeki
7–4
 
- Spring
Haru basho, Tokyo
Summer
Natsu basho, Tokyo
Autumn
Aki basho, Tokyo
1933 East Yokozuna
9–1
1d

 
East Yokozuna
10–1
 
Not held
1934 Sat out due to injury East Yokozuna
9–2
 
Not held
1935 East Yokozuna
10–1
 
East Yokozuna
10–1
 
Not held
1936 East Yokozuna
11–0
 
East Yokozuna
10–1
 
Not held
1937 East Yokozuna
6–1–4
 
East Yokozuna
9–4
 
Not held
1938 West Yokozuna
10–3
 
West Yokozuna
Retired
10–3
Not held
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Retired Lower Divisions

Key:  =Kinboshi(s);   d=Draw(s) (引分);   h=Hold(s) (預り)
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: YokozunaŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Rikishi of old: Tenryu Saburo and Shunjuen Incident". Sumo Fan Magazine. Retrieved 2007-10-10. 
  2. ^ "Banzuke". Sumo Fan Magazine. Retrieved 2007-10-11. 
  3. ^ Kuroda, Joe (October 2006). "Rikishi of Old:Minanogawa Tozo". Sumo Fan Magazine. Retrieved 2008-06-09. 
  4. ^ Sharnoff, Lora (1993). Grand Sumo. Weatherhill. ISBN 0-8348-0283-x. 
  5. ^ "Tamanishiki Sanemon". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 2007-09-26. 

See also[edit]

Previous:
Tsunenohana Kan'ichi
32nd Yokozuna
1932 - 1938
Next:
Musashiyama Takeshi
Yokozuna is not a successive rank, and more than one wrestler can share the title