Tamil American

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Tamil American
Coomaraswamy.jpg
Sendhil Ramamurthy (1).jpg
Kamala Harris Official Attorney General Photo.jpg
IndraNooyiDavos2010ver2.jpg
M. Night Shyamalan 2008 - still 40580 crop.jpg
Aziz Ansari 2011 Shankbone.JPG
Total population
132,573 (2010 US Census)[1]
Regions with significant populations
Languages
Predominantly: Minority:
Religion
Predominantly: Minority:
Related ethnic groups

Tamil Americans (தமிழ் அமெரிக்கர்) are Americans who are of Tamil ethnic origins, mostly from India and Sri Lanka and other countries such as Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Philippines, the French West Indies, South Africa, and the United Kingdom.

Demographics[edit]

The New York City Metropolitan Area, including Central New Jersey, as well as Long Island and Staten Island in New York, is home to the largest Tamil American (தமிழ் அமெரிக்கர்) population.

In the second half of the 20th century, Tamils from India migrated as skilled professionals to the United States, Canada, Europe, and Southeast Asia. The Tamil American population enumerates over 130,000 individuals,[2] and the Federation of Tamil Sangams of North America functions as an umbrella organization for the growing community as such.[3]

Central New Jersey is home to the largest population concentration of Tamils. New Jersey houses its own Tamil Sangam.[4] Sizeable populations of Indian American Tamils have also settled in New York City and the Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Area, as well as on the West Coast in Silicon Valley, where there are Tamil associations such as the Bay Area Tamil Manram.[5] On the other hand, the New York City and Los Angeles metropolitan areas are home to the largest concentrations of Tamil-speaking Sri Lankan Americans,[6][7][8] with New York City's Staten Island alone estimated to be home to more than 5,000 Sri Lankan Americans,[9] a significant proportion of whom speak Tamil.

2009 Tamil diaspora protests[edit]

Tamil Americans participated in the worldwide Tamil diaspora protests in 2009, where they urged national and world leaders and organizations to take action toward bringing a unanimous cease fire to the Sri Lankan Civil War. Protests occurred in the United States, concurrently with other protests in other parts of the world. They were organized by local Tamil American groups, with the help of Tamil Canadians. Major protests occurred on several occasions in Washington, D.C. near the White House, as well as smaller scale protests in New York City.

Notable Tamil Americans[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ US Census 2010 See Row# 125
  2. ^ US Census 2006-2008 American Community Survey See Row# 125
  3. ^ "ABOUT FETNA". Federation of Tamil Sangams of North America. Retrieved 2013-04-01. 
  4. ^ New Jersey Tamil Sangam
  5. ^ Bay Area Tamil Manram
  6. ^ "Yearbook of Immigration Statistics: 2012 Supplemental Table 2". U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Retrieved 2013-03-31. 
  7. ^ "Yearbook of Immigration Statistics: 2011 Supplemental Table 2". U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Retrieved 2013-03-31. 
  8. ^ "Yearbook of Immigration Statistics: 2010 Supplemental Table 2". U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Retrieved 2013-03-31. 
  9. ^ Kirk Semple (2013-06-08). "Sri Lankans have gathered on Staten Island,...". The New York Times. Retrieved 2013-06-09.