Tancanhuitz de Santos

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Tancanhuitz de Santos
Municipality and Town
Traditional Huastec hut in the Coyol Ja community, Tancanhuitz Municipality
Traditional Huastec hut in the Coyol Ja community, Tancanhuitz Municipality
Location of the municipality in San Luis Potosí
Location of the municipality in San Luis Potosí
Coordinates: 21°36′N 98°58′W / 21.600°N 98.967°W / 21.600; -98.967
Country  Mexico
State San Luis Potosí
Government
 • Municipal President Rafael Cruz Mendoza (PRI)
Area
 • Total 134.05 km2 (51.76 sq mi)
Elevation 200 m (656 ft)
Population (2005)
 • Total 25,055
 • Density 152.89/km2 (396.0/sq mi)
Time zone Central Standard Time (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) Central Daylight Time (UTC-5)

Tancanhuitz de Santos is a town and one of the 58 municipalities of the state of San Luis Potosí in central Mexico.[1] Its name comes from the Wastek language, and means Place of Flowers or Canoe of yellow flowers.[2] It is located in the southeastern part of the state, approximately 330 km (210 mi) from the city of San Luis Potosí. The municipality covers an area of 134.05 km². As of the 2005 census, the it had a total population of 20,495, of which 10,180 were men and 10,315 were women.[3]

Geography[edit]

Location[edit]

Tancanhuitz is located in the southeastern part of the state, at 21° 36’ northern latitude, and 98° 58’ western longitude. It is at an average height of 200 meters above sea level.

The municipality is bordered by the municipalities of Aquismón and Tanlajás to the north, Tanlajás and San Antonio to the east, Huehuetlán and Coxcatlán to the south, and Aquismón to the west.

Orography and Hydrography[edit]

The territory covered by the municipality is mostly rugged, although there is a small flat region to the north of the municipal capital. The geology of the region is classified as Mesozoic, and the land is used primarily for raising livestock, forestry, and agriculture.[4] The municipality belongs to the Panuco hydrologic region.[5] Its water resources are supplied by the Oxitipa, Tampaón, and Coy Rivers. There are also some seasonal creeks there, such as the Tancanhuitz, as well as several springs.

References[edit]

  1. ^ (Spanish) "-". Enciclopedia de los Municipios de México. Instituto Nacional para el Federalismo y el Desarrollo Municipal. Retrieved January 11, 2010. 
  2. ^ (Spanish) "División Municipal". Pacificosur. Retrieved November 29, 2008. 
  3. ^ (Spanish) "Principales resultados por localidad 2005 (ITER)". INEGI. Retrieved November 29, 2008. 
  4. ^ (Spanish) "Elevaciones Principales". INEGI. Retrieved November 29, 2008. 
  5. ^ (Spanish) "Mapa de Regiones Hidrológicas". INEGI. Retrieved November 29, 2008.