Taneytown, Maryland

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Taneytown, Maryland
town
Official seal of Taneytown, Maryland
Seal
Location of Taneytown, Maryland
Location of Taneytown, Maryland
Coordinates: 39°39′26″N 77°10′14″W / 39.65722°N 77.17056°W / 39.65722; -77.17056Coordinates: 39°39′26″N 77°10′14″W / 39.65722°N 77.17056°W / 39.65722; -77.17056
Country United States
State Maryland
County Carroll
Government
 • Mayor James L McCarron Jr.
Area[1]
 • Total 3.05 sq mi (7.90 km2)
 • Land 3.04 sq mi (7.87 km2)
 • Water 0.01 sq mi (0.03 km2)
Elevation 505 ft (154 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 6,728
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 6,731
 • Density 2,213.2/sq mi (854.5/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 21787
Area code(s) 410
FIPS code 24-76725
GNIS feature ID 0587687
Website www.taneytown.org

Taneytown (pronunciation: /ˈtɔːnitn/ TAW-nee-town) is a city in Carroll County, Maryland, United States. The population was 6,728 at the 2010 census.[4] Taneytown was founded in 1754. Of the town, George Washington once wrote, "Tan-nee town is but a small place with only the Street through wch. the road passes, built on. The buildings are principally of wood." Taneytown has a history museum that displays the history of the town for visitors and citizens to see. The Bullfrog Road Bridge was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1978.[5]

Geography[edit]

Taneytown is located at 39°39′26″N 77°10′14″W / 39.65722°N 77.17056°W / 39.65722; -77.17056 (39.657099, -77.170627).[6]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 3.05 square miles (7.90 km2), of which, 3.04 square miles (7.87 km2) is land and 0.01 square miles (0.03 km2) is water.[1]

Demographics[edit]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 6,728 people, 2,434 households, and 1,813 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,213.2 inhabitants per square mile (854.5 /km2). There were 2,554 housing units at an average density of 840.1 per square mile (324.4 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 91.3% White, 4.5% African American, 0.1% Native American, 0.7% Asian, 0.5% from other races, and 2.7% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.7% of the population.

There were 2,434 households of which 40.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.3% were married couples living together, 14.7% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.4% had a male householder with no wife present, and 25.5% were non-families. 20.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.74 and the average family size was 3.14.

The median age in the city was 1256 years. 27.9% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.3% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 26.2% were from 25 to 44; 24.3% were from 45 to 64; and 13.3% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 47.5% male and 52.5% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[7] of 2000, there were 5,128 people, 1,786 households, and 1,387 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,781.1 people per square mile (687.5/km²). There were 1,848 housing units at an average density of 641.9 per square mile (247.7/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 96.00% White, 1.74% African American, 0.16% Native American, 0.47% Asian, 0.62% from other races, and 1.01% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.50% of the population.

There were 1,786 households out of which 47.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.1% were married couples living together, 15.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.3% were non-families. 17.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.87 and the average family size was 3.22.

In the city the population was spread out with 34.1% under the age of 18, 7.3% from 18 to 24, 35.4% from 25 to 44, 15.7% from 45 to 64, and 7.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females there were 96.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.7 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $42,820, and the median income for a family was $49,615. Males had a median income of $31,862 versus $24,261 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,258. About 9.0% of families and 11.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.7% of those under age 18 and 10.0% of those age 65 or over.

History[edit]

Taneytown takes its name from Raphael Taney, a recipient of one of the first land grants in the area, though Taney likely never lived in the town that bears his name. U.S. Supreme Court Justice Roger Brooke Taney, author of the Dred Scott decision, born in 1777, shares a common ancestor with him.[8]

Much of the town was added to the National Register of Historic Places as the Taneytown Historic District in 1986.[5]

Taneytown was the first city in Maryland to make English the official language.[citation needed]

There is a Steve Earle song called "Taneytown" on his album El Corazon.

Notable inhabitants[edit]

Taneytown was the headquarters of Union Army General George Meade for a period during the American Civil War. Fellow Civil War general Jacob G. Lauman was born in Taneytown.

Congressman Joseph A. Goulden of New York was from a family with a house in Taneytown, where he usually stayed during the summer. Goulden was present in Gettysburg when Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address, and Goulden heard the speech in person.[9][10]

Taneytown was home to Fr. Demetrius Augustine Gallitzin, Catholic priest, missionary, and Russian prince during the late 18th century.

Actor Fred Gwynne, star of TV's The Munsters, died in Taneytown on July 2, 1993, after he was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer.

Haunted Barn[edit]

Every October since 1974 the Taneytown Jaycees organize a Halloween event called "The Haunted Barn". This is a haunted house tour through an old warehouse (the original barn location was destroyed by an arsonist in 1986) decorated for the event. The design of the tour changes every year but always ends with visitors being chased by masked attendants with chainsaws.

The city sought to close the Haunted Barn after an accident involving two teenaged visitors, one of whom was severely injured. The city decided that the site would be best used as a recreation center for children. The barn is no longer active.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-25. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-25. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-26. 
  4. ^ "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (DP-1): Taneytown city, Maryland". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved August 6, 2012. 
  5. ^ a b "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2008-04-15. 
  6. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  7. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  8. ^ http://www.taneytown.org/history.asp
  9. ^ United National Association of Postal Clerks, The Post Office Clerk magazine, Volumes 13-14, June, 1915, page 6
  10. ^ Tyler J. Boone, Taneytown, 2004, page 63

External links[edit]