Tara June Winch

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Tara June Winch
Tara June Winch.jpg
Born 1983[1]

Tara June Winch (born 1983) is an Australian writer of Aboriginal, West Asian, and European descent. Her first novel, Swallow the Air (2007), won several major Australian literary awards.

Life[edit]

Winch was born in Wollongong, New South Wales, of Wiradjuri, Afghan, and English descent.[1] At 17, Winch left home to travel across Australia; she continued on to India. She settled for six months at a Buddhist center in Scotland.[2]

Winch has one daughter. She currently lives in Paris. She had lived in New York City after an internship at the United Nations. She has started a charity to promote female empowerment called onethousand.org.[3]

Writing[edit]

Her first novel, Swallow the Air (2007), won several awards. The judges for the Sydney Morning Herald Best Young Novelists award wrote that the book "is distinguished by its natural grace and vivid language" and that "As with many first books it deals with issues of family, growing up and stepping into the world. But it strives to connect these experiences to broader social issues, though never in a didactic fashion".[4] Thuy On writes, "Swallow the Air can either be read as a novel with short chapters or as a series of inter-linked short stories" and describes Winch's style in the following words: "in between prose of unvarnished vernacular, Winch offers lyrical sentences that annoy in terrible metaphorical allusions".[5]

Winch has also had been published in Vogue, VICE, McSweeney's, Overland, Best Australian Stories 2005, 2006, 2010, the Griffith Review, The Bulletin, The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age, as well as others.

Winning the Rolex Mentor and Protégé Arts Initiative in 2008, Winch was paired with author Wole Soyinka as a mentor.[6]

Awards and nominations[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Tara June Winch at University of Queensland Press
  2. ^ Cornwell, Jane (14 June 2008). "The Face: Tara June Winch". The Australian. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  3. ^ [1]
  4. ^ a b Wyndham, Susan (2007) "A fairytale beginning," The Sydney Morning Herald, Arts and Entertainment Section, 2–3 June 2007, p. 9
  5. ^ On, Thuy "A talent to watch", Australian Book Review, Accessed: 2007-08-29
  6. ^ a b c d Moran, Jennifer (2008) "Indigenous writer makes shortlist for coveted prize", The Canberra Times, 2008-04-11, p. 5
  7. ^ State Library of Queensland Young Writers Award, Runner up and Maureen Donahoe Encouragement award. Slq.qld.gov.au. Retrieved on 2011-11-06.