Tarnak Farms

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Tarnak Farms still a ruins in 2005.

Tarnak Farms refers to a former Afghan training camp near Kandahar.

The camp is very near the Kandahar airport.

The Al-Qaeda camp is alleged to have offered training constructing bombs, using poisons, urban warfare, and assassination.[citation needed] American counter-terrorism analysts assert that their sources claim all the camp's trainees had to attend Al Qaeda's Al Farouq camp first.[citation needed] American counter-terrorism analysts assert that their sources claim that all trainees have to be prepared to serve as suicide bombers.[citation needed]

After the United States forces took over the airport they used the ruins for their own training exercises.

9-11 hijackers believed to have trained at Tarnak Farms[edit]

Mohamed Atta Recorded his will at Tarnak Farms.[1]
Ziad Jarrah Recorded his will at Tarnak Farms.[1]

Suspects believed to have trained at Tarnak Farms[edit]

isn name notes
578 Abdul Aziz Adbullah Ali Al Suadi
2 David Matthew Hicks
27 Uthman Abdul Rahim Mohammed Uthman
  • Yemeni
  • Denies participating in any training or hostilities[2]
535 Tariq Mahmoud Ahmed Al Sawah
63 Mohammed al Qahtani
  • The Summary of Evidence memo prepared for his third annual review in 2008 asserted he had acknowledged spending two months training at Tarnak Farms:[3]
  • The detainee stated that after al Farouq training camp, he started advanced training at the Tarnak Farms Training Camp near Kandahar, Afghanistan.[3]
  • The detainee stated he spent approximately two months at Tarnak Farms Training Camp. The detainee practiced firing automatic rifles and pistols while walking, running, and from moving vehicles. The detainee also practiced urban warfare techniques, such as room clearing, kicking down doors, and jumping through windows. The detainee was also shown how to use explosives to blow open a locked door.[3]
  • The Tarnak Farms facility housed an al Qaida poison and explosive training laboratory and an advanced operational training camp. The Tarnak Farms camp was the most important al Qaida training camp in Afghanistan since it was where al Qaida operatives received advanced operational training including urban assault and other tactics.[3]
258 Nayif Abdallah Ibrahim Ibrahim
  • The Summary of Evidence memo prepared for his third annual review asserted "a source" reported attending a "city tactics course" with Nayif.:[4]
  • The city tactics course length was five to six weeks long and primarily covered assassinations in urban areas. The training was held at the Tarnak Farms Camp, Kandahar, Afghanistan.[4]
223 Abdul Rahman Abdul Abu Ghityh Sulayman
  • The Summary of Evidence memo prepared for his third annual review asserted "a source" reported attending a "city tactics course" with Nayif.:[4]
A source identified the detainee as someone who was at Tarnak Farms in January 2000.
74 Mesh Arsad al Rashid

The "factors favoring release or transfer" on his first and third annual reviews reported that he had denied knowing anything about Tarnak Farms.

757 Ahamed Abdel Aziz
  • His 2004 Combatant Status Review Tribunal and his third annual review in 2007 stated: "The detainee attended a speech by Usama bin Ladin at Tarnak Farms , near Kandahar, Afghanistan."
  • His first annual review in 2005 stated that he attended the bin Laden speech at Tarnak Farms in November 1999.
235 Saeed Ahmed Mohammed Abdullah Sarem Jarabh

Allegations on his second annual review board stated that he attended one week of AK-47 training at the Abu Abaida Training Camp. Those allegations stated:

  • "The detainee trained with weapons for one week at the Abu Abaida Training Camp, also known as Tarnak Farms near the Kandahar Airport in Afghanistan."
  • "The Tarnak Farms facility in Afghanistan housed an al Qaida poison and explosive training laboratory and an advanced operational training camp. The Tarnak Farms camp was considered the most important al Qaida training camp in Afghanistan since it was where al Qaida operatives received advanced operational training including urban assault and other tactics."

Home to bin Laden[edit]

In 1998, Bin Laden moved his followers from Nazim Jihad to Tarnak Farms following Northern Alliance threats to attack Jalalabad.[5]

It was widely reported that a visit to the Tarnak Farms in 2000 represented a rare opportunity to kill Osama Bin Laden.[6][7][8][9][10] It was reported that Tarnak Farms was one of bin Laden's homes, but President Clinton was shown drone footage that reportedly showed a child's swingset at the camp and was "haunted" at the prospect of bombing innocent families.[11]

Intelligence Trove[edit]

In December 2001 American forces occupied the site. They claim they found a wealth of intelligence. The camp was taken over by the Americans to be used for their training.

April 17, 2002 friendly fire incident[edit]

On April 17, 2002, four Canadian soldiers of the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry were killed at this site while conducting a night time live-fire training exercise. Two passing American F-16s piloted by U.S. Air National Guard Majors Harry Schmidt and William Umbach had mistaken the machine gun and anti-tank weapons flashes of the exercise for enemy fire and dropped a 227-kilogram (500 lb) Mark 82 laser-guided bomb on the Canadian position, despite orders to await confirmation.

The bomb killed Canadian Forces Sgt Marc Leger, Cpl Ainsworth Dyer, Pte Richard Green and Pte Nathan Lloyd Smith and wounded eight other CF soldiers.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Watch the video: Osama Bin Laden's HQ". The Times Online. 2006-10-01. 
  2. ^ documents (.pdf) from Uthman Abdul Rahim Mohammed Uthman's Combatant Status Review Tribunal
  3. ^ a b c d OARDEC (2008-01-17). "Unclassified Summary of Evidence for Administrative Review Board in the case of Al Qahtani, Maad". United States Department of Defense. pp. pages 34–37. Retrieved 2009-06-08. 
  4. ^ a b c OARDEC (2007-04-24). "Unclassified Summary of Evidence for Administrative Review Board in the case of Nayif A Al Nukhiylan". United States Department of Defense. pp. pages 64–66. Retrieved 2009-02-09. 
  5. ^ Testimony of Abdurahman Khadr as a witness in the trial against Charkaoui, July 13, 2004
  6. ^ Mark Sage (March 18, 2004). "CIA missed chance to capture bin Laden in 2000". The Scotsman,. Retrieved 2006-12-30. 
  7. ^ "Missed opportunities: The CIA had pictures. Why wasn’t the al-Qaida leader captured or killed?". MSNBC. March 17, 2004. Retrieved 2006-12-30. 
  8. ^ "Watch the video: Osama Bin Laden's HQ". The Times. October 1, 2006. Retrieved 2006-12-30. 
  9. ^ "Focus: Chilling message of the 9/11 pilots". The Times. October 1, 2006. Retrieved 2006-12-30. 
  10. ^ Steve Coll (February 21, 2004). "Legal Disputes Over Hunt Paralyzed Clinton's Aides". Washington Post. Retrieved 2006-12-30. 
  11. ^ Mayer, Jane, "The Dark Side", 2008.

Coordinates: 31°27′18″N 65°49′26″E / 31.455°N 65.824°E / 31.455; 65.824