Ruy Lopez, Tarrasch Trap

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Tarrasch Trap)
Jump to: navigation, search

Tarrasch Trap refers to two different chess opening traps in the Ruy Lopez that are named for Siegbert Tarrasch. Unlike many variations that appear only in analysis, Tarrasch actually sprung his traps against masters in tournament games.


Tarrasch Trap in the Open Variation[edit]

a b c d e f g h
8
Chessboard480.svg
a8 black rook
f8 black rook
g8 black king
c7 black pawn
d7 black queen
e7 black bishop
f7 black pawn
g7 black pawn
h7 black pawn
a6 black pawn
c6 black knight
e6 black bishop
b5 black pawn
d5 black pawn
e5 white pawn
d4 white knight
e4 black knight
b3 white bishop
c3 white pawn
a2 white pawn
b2 white pawn
f2 white pawn
g2 white pawn
h2 white pawn
a1 white rook
b1 white knight
c1 white bishop
d1 white queen
e1 white rook
g1 white king
8
7 7
6 6
5 5
4 4
3 3
2 2
1 1
a b c d e f g h
Position after 11...Qd7? White wins a piece.

Two masters actually fell for this trap against Tarrasch: Johannes Zukertort at Frankfurt in 1887 and Isidor Gunsberg at Manchester in 1890.

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. 0-0 Nxe4

This is the Open Variation of the Ruy Lopez.

6. d4 b5 7. Bb3 d5 8. dxe5 Be6 9. c3 Be7 10. Re1 0-0 11. Nd4 Qd7? (see diagram)

Falling into the trap.

12. Nxe6

Black's pawn on d5 will be pinned (along the d-file or along the a2–g8 diagonal) no matter how he recaptures. After 12...Qxe6 or 12...fxe6 White wins a piece with 13.Rxe4.

Tarrasch Trap in the Steinitz Variation[edit]

The second Tarrasch Trap, sometimes referred to as the Dresden Trap, occurs in the Steinitz Variation. Tarrasch published analysis of this trap in 1891, but 18 months later Georg Marco fell into it in Tarrasch versus Marco, Dresden 1892.[1] Tarrasch spent just five minutes thinking during the entire game.

a b c d e f g h
8
Chessboard480.svg
a8 black rook
d8 black queen
e8 black king
h8 black rook
a7 black pawn
b7 black pawn
c7 black pawn
d7 black bishop
e7 black bishop
f7 black pawn
g7 black pawn
h7 black pawn
c6 black knight
d6 black pawn
f6 black knight
b5 white bishop
e5 black pawn
d4 white pawn
e4 white pawn
c3 white knight
f3 white knight
a2 white pawn
b2 white pawn
c2 white pawn
f2 white pawn
g2 white pawn
h2 white pawn
a1 white rook
c1 white bishop
d1 white queen
e1 white rook
g1 white king
8
7 7
6 6
5 5
4 4
3 3
2 2
1 1
a b c d e f g h
Position after 7.Re1. Now 7...0-0? falls into the trap.

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 d6

This is the Steinitz Variation of the Ruy Lopez.

4. d4 Bd7

Black breaks the pin to meet the threat of 5.d5.

5. Nc3 Nf6 6. 0-0 Be7 7. Re1 (see diagram)

Laying a subtle trap. Castling seems natural for Black but it loses a pawn. Instead, 7...exd4 is better.

7... 0-0? 8. Bxc6 Bxc6 9. dxe5 dxe5 10. Qxd8 Raxd8 11. Nxe5

Black's best move here is probably 11...Bd7, although White would remain a pawn ahead.

11... Bxe4?! 12. Nxe4 Nxe4

White can go astray too, 13.Rxe4?? would be a horrible blunder as Black would checkmate with 13...Rd1+ 14. Re1 Rxe1#. White blocks that possibility with his next move, making the threat real against the black knight on e4.

13. Nd3 f5

The black knight cannot move because of the pin against the bishop on e7.

14. f3 Bc5+?!

Better is 14...Bh4 15.g3 Nxg3 16.hxg3 Bxg3 where Black get two pawns for the knight.

15. Nxc5 Nxc5 16. Bg5 Rd5 17. Be7 Re8 18. c4 1–0

White wins at least the exchange, so Marco resigned.

Notes[edit]

References[edit]