Tarski's World

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Tarski's World is a computer-based introduction to first-order logic written by Jon Barwise and John Etchemendy. It is named after the mathematical logician Alfred Tarski. The package includes a book, which serves as a textbook and manual, and a computer program which together serve as an introduction to the semantics of logic through games in which simple, three-dimensional worlds are populated with various geometric figures and these are used to test the truth or falsehood of first-order logic sentences. The program is also included in Language, Proof and Logic package.[1][2][3][4][5]

The programme[edit]

  • Barwise, J., & Etchemendy, J. (1993). Tarski's world. Stanford, Calif: CSLI Publ.
  • Barker-Plummer, D., Barwise, J., & Etchemendy, J. (2008). Tarski's world. Stanford, Calif: CSLI Publications.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Goldson, D., (1994) Review of The Language of First-Order Logic, including the Macintosh Program Tarski's World. The Philosophical Quarterly, 44, 175, 272–275.
  2. ^ Fallis, D.,(1999). Review of The Language of First-Order Logic, Including the IBM-Compatible Windows Version of Tarski's World 4.0. Journal of Symbolic Logic, 64, 2, 916–918.
  3. ^ Compton, K. J., (1993). Review of The Language of First-Order Logic, including the Program Tarski's World. Journal of Symbolic Logic, 58, 1, 362–363.
  4. ^ Bailhache, P.(1992). Review of The Language of First-Order Logic, Including the Macintosh™ Tarski's World. Studia Logica, 51, 1, 145–147.
  5. ^ Goldson, D., Reeves, S. and R. Bornat (1993) A Review of Several Programs for the Teaching of Logic, The Computer Journal, Volume 36, Issue 4, pp. 373-386

External links[edit]