Tatjana Soli

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Tatjana Soli is an American novelist and short story writer. Her first novel, The Lotus Eaters (2010), won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize, was a finalist for the Los Angeles Book Prize, was a New York Times Bestseller, and a New York Times 2010 Notable Book. Her second novel, The Forgetting Tree (2012) was a New York Times Notable Book. Her work has appeared in a variety of publications including The New York Times Book Review.

Career[edit]

Soli graduated from Stanford University, and later the Warren Wilson College with an MFA.[1][2] She received scholarships to the Sewanee Writers' Conference and the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference.

Her work has appeared in Zyzzyva, Boulevard, Five Chapters, The Normal School, The Sun,[3] StoryQuarterly,[4] Confrontation,[5] Gulf Coast, Other Voices, Inkwell Journal,[6] Nimrod,[7] Third Coast, Carolina Quarterly, Sonora Review,[8] North Dakota Quarterly,[9] Washington Square Review,[10] and Web del Sol.[11]

Personal life[edit]

She is married and lives in Orange County, California.[12]

Awards[edit]

Works[edit]

Anthology[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Warren Wilson College Library-New Books, April 2006". Warren-wilson.edu. 31 December 2004. Retrieved 20 October 2011. 
  2. ^ "1000 Black Lines: Warren Wilson MFA faculty Public Readings". 1000blacklines.blogspot.com. 6 January 2006. Retrieved 20 October 2011. 
  3. ^ Tatjana Soli. "The Sweet And The Salt". The Sun Magazine. Retrieved 20 October 2011. 
  4. ^ StoryQuarterly – Google Books. Google Books. 29 February 2008. Retrieved 20 October 2011. 
  5. ^ "In This Issue". Google. Retrieved 20 October 2011. 
  6. ^ [1][dead link]
  7. ^ Nimrod – University of Tulsa – Google Books. Google Books. 29 February 2008. Retrieved 20 October 2011. 
  8. ^ Sonora review – Google Books. Google Books. 6 June 2008. Retrieved 20 October 2011. 
  9. ^ The North Dakota quarterly – University of North Dakota – Google Books. Google Books. 17 January 2008. Retrieved 20 October 2011. 
  10. ^ "Washington Square Review". Retrieved September 2012. 
  11. ^ "Other Voices". Webdelsol.com. Retrieved 20 October 2011. 
  12. ^ "bio". Tatjanasoli.com. 30 July 2010. Retrieved 20 October 2011. 
  13. ^ "Dazzling tale of Ms Saigon takes top award". The Scotsman (UK). 20 August 2011. 
  14. ^ "2011 List". ALA. 24 January 2011. Retrieved 20 October 2011. 
  15. ^ "2010 Los Angeles Times Book Prize finalists announced". Latimesblogs.latimes.com. 22 February 2011. Retrieved 20 October 2011. 
  16. ^ "100 Notable Books of 2010," New York Times, November 24, 2010. Retrieved September 14, 2012.

External links[edit]