Tatsuki Machida

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Tatsuki Machida
Tatsuki Machida Podium 2014 World Championships.jpg
Personal information
Country represented Japan
Born (1990-03-09) March 9, 1990 (age 25)
Kawasaki, Kanagawa, Japan
Height 1.62 m (5 ft 4 in)
Former coach Yoshinori Onishi, Phillip Mills, Anthony Liu, Azumi Hata, Hiroshi Koizumi
Former choreographer Phillip Mills, Stephane Lambiel, Kenji Miyamoto, Kano Ito, Nanami Abe, Noriko Sato
Skating club Kansai University SC
Former training locations Takaishi, Osaka
Lake Arrowhead, California
Began skating 1993
Retired December 2014
ISU personal best scores
Combined total 282.26
2014 World
Short program 98.21
2014 World
Free skate 184.05
2014 World
Japanese name
Kanji 町田 樹
Kana まちだ たつき

Tatsuki Machida (町田 樹 Machida Tatsuki?) (born March 9, 1990) is a Japanese figure skater. He is the 2014 World silver medalist, the 2010 Four Continents silver medalist, and the 2013–14 Japanese national silver medalist. Machida is the winner of four Grand Prix events — the 2012 Cup of China, 2013 Skate America, 2013 Rostelecom Cup, and 2014 Skate America.

Personal life[edit]

Tatsuki Machida was born in Kawasaki, Kanagawa, Japan.[1] He studied literature at Kansai University in Osaka.[2] In 2015, he will begin a Master's program in sport management at Waseda University's Graduate School of Sciences.[3][4][5]

Career[edit]

In 2011, Machida moved to the U.S. to train at Lake Arrowhead, California's Ice Castle, where he was coached mainly by Anthony Liu.[6][7]

Machida won his first senior Grand Prix medal, bronze, at the 2012 Skate America. He won his first senior GP title at the 2012 Cup of China, where he beat former World champion Daisuke Takahashi. These results qualified him for the Grand Prix Final, where he finished sixth overall.

At the 2013 Skate America, Machida won his second GP title. He placed first in the short and free programs, setting personal bests in both and winning by 25 points over second place finisher, Adam Rippon of the United States. At 2013 Rostelecom Cup, Machida was second after the short program behind Maxim Kovtun of Russia. However, he won the free skate by over 25 points to win the competition – over 16 points ahead of Kovtun. This meant that he qualified for the Grand Prix Final in second overall, behind Patrick Chan of Canada. At the Grand Prix Final he recovered from a rough short program to skate a very strong long program, and finish 4th. He would finish 2nd at the 2013–14 Japan Figure Skating Championships, securing a spot on the Japanese Olympic and World teams for the first time.

At the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Machida placed 11th in the short program, fourth in the free skate, and fifth overall.[2] Machida significantly improved his personal best short program score at the 2014 World Championships in Saitama, Japan and ranked first in the segment. He placed second in the free skate and was awarded the silver medal, finishing behind Yuzuru Hanyu by a margin of 0.33 of a point.

For the 2014–15 season, Machida was assigned to the 2014 Skate America and 2014 Trophée Éric Bompard.[8] Skating to his second Skate America title, he placed first in the short and free programs, setting personal bests in both, and won by 30 points over the second place finisher, Jason Brown of the United States. It was Machida's fourth GP title. At the 2014 Trophée Éric Bompard, he placed second in both the short program and the free program to finish second overall behind Maxim Kovtun. This qualified him for the Grand Prix Final for the third consecutive year. After finishing second in the short program, he struggled in the long program, finishing sixth in that segment and overall. Machida finished fourth at the 2014–15 Japan Championships and was selected for the 2015 World team.[3] However, he announced his retirement from competitive skating to focus on his studies, and Takahito Mura was given his World spot.[5][9]

Programs[edit]

Machida at the 2014 World Championships podium
Machida at the 2013 Skate America podium
Season Short program Free skating Exhibition
2014–15
[10][1]
2013–14
[11]
  • Byakuyako
    > by Stin Kono
    choreo. by Tatsuki Machida
2012–13
[12]
  • The Firebird
    > by Igor Stravinsky
    choreo. by Phillip Mills
2011–12
[13][14]
  • Don't Stop Me Now
    > by Queen
2010–11
2009–10
[15]
2008–09
  • Peach〜Ashihara Story〜 (ex. 004)
    >by PE'Z
    choreo. by Kano Ogiyama
  • Peach〜Ashihara Story〜 (ex. 004)
    >by PE'Z
    choreo. by Kano Ogiyama
2007–08
[16]
2006–07
[17]
  • Find love
    > by Enigma
    choreo. by Kano Ogiyama
2005–06
2004–05

Competitive highlights[edit]

GP: Grand Prix; JGP: Junior Grand Prix

International[18]
Event 03–04 04–05 05–06 06–07 07–08 08–09 09–10 10–11 11–12 12–13 13–14 14–15
Olympics 5th
Worlds 2nd
Four Continents 2nd 7th
Grand Prix Final 6th 4th 6th
GP Bompard 2nd
GP Cup of China 5th 1st
GP NHK Trophy 7th
GP Rostelecom 11th 1st
GP Skate America 3rd 1st 1st
Asian Games 4th
Asian Trophy 1st
Golden Spin 1st
Nebelhorn 1st WD[6]
Nepela Trophy 1st
NRW Trophy 6th
Printemps 2nd
Triglav Trophy 1st
Universiade 5th
International: Junior[18]
Junior Worlds 9th
JGP Austria 9th
JGP Czech Rep. 2nd
JGP Estonia 10th
JGP France 7th
JGP Mexico 4th
JGP Poland 7th
JGP Spain 3rd
JGP U.K. 1st
Gardena 5th J. 1st J.
National[19]
Japan Champ. 13th 7th 4th 6th 4th 9th 2nd 4th
Japan Junior 12th 5th 7th 1st 7th 2nd
Team events
Olympics 5th
J. = Junior level; WD = Withdrew

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Tatsuki MACHIDA: 2014/2015". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on December 29, 2014. 
  2. ^ a b "Tatsuki MACHIDA". Organizing Committee of the XXII Olympic Winter Games. Archived from the original on April 7, 2014. 
  3. ^ a b "Machida suddenly calls it quits". Yomiuri Shimbun. December 29, 2014. Archived from the original on December 29, 2014. 
  4. ^ "「誇りを胸に堂々と競技人生に終止符を」 町田樹、現役引退コメント全文" [Machida comments]. sportsnavi (in Japanese). December 28, 2014. 
  5. ^ a b "Japanese figure skating star Machida announces retirement". Agence France-Presse (France 24). December 29, 2014. Archived from the original on December 29, 2014. 
  6. ^ a b c d Flade, Tatjana (June 17, 2012). "World team aspiration for Machida". Golden Skate. 
  7. ^ "Interview with Tatsuki Machida in Oberstdorf, September 2011". FigureSkating-Online. October 7, 2011. Retrieved October 9, 2011. 
  8. ^ "2014–15 Grand Prix entries". International Skating Union. July 10, 2014. 
  9. ^ Zaccardi, Nick (December 28, 2014). "Tatsuki Machida retires from figure skating". NBC Sports. Retrieved December 28, 2014. 
  10. ^ Flade, Tatjana (November 5, 2014). "Japan’s Machida out of the shadows". Golden Skate. 
  11. ^ "Tatsuki MACHIDA: 2013/2014". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on June 21, 2014. 
  12. ^ "Tatsuki MACHIDA: 2012/2013". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on August 30, 2013. 
  13. ^ "Tatsuki MACHIDA: 2011/2012". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on April 19, 2012. 
  14. ^ "Tatsuki MACHIDA: 2011/2012". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on October 25, 2011. 
  15. ^ "Tatsuki MACHIDA: 2009/2010". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on April 30, 2010. 
  16. ^ "Tatsuki MACHIDA: 2007/2008". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on June 26, 2008. 
  17. ^ "Tatsuki MACHIDA: 2006/2007". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on June 23, 2007. 
  18. ^ a b "Competition Results: Tatsuki MACHIDA". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on December 29, 2014. 
  19. ^ "町田 樹/MACHIDA Tatsuki" (in Japanese). Japan Skating Federation. Archived from the original on December 29, 2014. 

External links[edit]

Media related to Tatsuki Machida at Wikimedia Commons