Sheppard Pratt at Ellicott City

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Sheppard Pratt at Ellicott City
Sheppard Pratt at Ellicott City is located in Maryland
Sheppard Pratt at Ellicott City
Geography
Location Ellicott City, Maryland, United States
Coordinates 39°15′23″N 76°47′35″W / 39.256250°N 76.793028°W / 39.256250; -76.793028Coordinates: 39°15′23″N 76°47′35″W / 39.256250°N 76.793028°W / 39.256250; -76.793028
Organization
Hospital type Psychiatric hospital
Affiliated university Sheppard Pratt
Services
Beds 50
Links
Website http://www.sheppardpratt.org/
Lists Hospitals in the United States

Sheppard Pratt at Ellicott City.[1] is a private psychiatric hospital located in Ellicott City, Maryland. It currently has an 18 bed adult unit, a 16 bed co-occurring disorders unit, a 16 bed crisis stabilization unit, and an adult day hospital. The hospital is owned and operated by the Towson, Maryland based Sheppard Pratt Health System

Prior to its purchase by Sheppard Pratt the facility was known as Taylor Manor, one of only a dozen privately owned psychiatric facilities in the nation. [2]

History[edit]

In 1907 Taylor Manor started as the Patapsco Manor Sanitarium built on property along New Cut road in Ellicott City. The twenty person facility suffered a fire in 1923.[3] In 1939 the facility was purchased by Issac Taylor and run as the Pinel Clinic. Taylor operated an optometrist business and Taylor’s Furniture on Main Street. In 1948 the facility expanded to 48 beds, and in 1968 it expanded to 151 beds.[4] The modern architecture circular rotunda stands out at the center of campus. Operated by Dr. Irving Taylor, and later Bruce T. Taylor in 1979, who served as medical director and chief executive officer, Taylor Manor covered more than 70 acres (28 ha) in Ellicott City Maryland. The Ayrd library is named after Taylor Manor Hospital Psychiatric Award winner Frank J. Ayrd.[5][6]

The campus property has been expanded and subdivided by the Taylor family. The southern portion became a county landfill and sections were sold for housing. The campus acreage totaled 55 acres (22 ha) in 2000.[7] By 2000, Taylor Manor had an operating loss of $1.1 million a year on $15.8 million in revenues. In 2001 Taylor manor’s programs were absorbed into the 1500 employee Sheppard Pratt system.[8]

In 2006 Grassroots crisis intervention center operated a 33 bed homeless shelter on the campus while expanding their facilities at Atholton High School.[9]

"Firsts" at Taylor Manor[edit]

In 1966, Taylor Manor started the first psychiatric treatment program in Maryland for adolescents.[10] Irving Taylor collaborated with on-site research into the drug Thorazine.[11] In 1983 Robert L Custer took gambling research from Ohio to Taylor Manor to create a Gambling addiction treatment center . He summarized that gambling addicts had a fear of dying and included a treatment plan that included repaying gambling debts.[12]

Significant events[edit]

Date Event
1851 Moses Sheppard founds the first Asylum funded by the State of Maryland. The Sheppard Asylum opens in 1891.[13]
1907 The 12 bed Patapsco Manor Sanirium is built.
1939 Potapsco Manor is purchased from Dr. Rushmore White and managed by Ellicott City shop owner Isaac H. Taylor.[14] The facility is renamed the Pinel Clinic.
1941 Pinel Clinc opens a disturbed ward building and occupational therapy shop.
1948 A Four story 24,000 sq ft facility is built on campus. Expanding capacity to 48 beds.
1954 Hospital renamed Taylor Manor
1968 The New Center opens with 151 beds.
1978 Dr. Irving Taylor dies
1979 Dr. Irving Taylor starts mental health symposiums continuing for over 25 years.[15]
1991 Taylor manor opens an 8 to 22 month program for clergy members in need of support.[16]
1997 Behavioral Health Management Association (BHMA) petitions to run a 26 bed hospital for juvenile sex offenders.[17]
2000 Taylor Manor serves 1,544 inpatients and 4,522 outpatient visits. .[18]
2001 Taylor Manor attempts to exchange campus property to build a school in Ellicott City.
2002 Sheppard Pratt starts operations at Taylor Manor.

Areas of concentration[edit]

Notable staff[edit]

  • Frank J Ayd – Pioneer in psychopharmacotherapy.[19][20][21]

Notable patients[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Sheppard Pratt". Retrieved 25 August 2013. 
  2. ^ "Sheppard Pratt". Retrieved 25 August 2013. 
  3. ^ "ATIENTS ARE SAVED FROM HOSPITAL FIRE: Skidding Apparatus, Answering Ellicott City Alarm, Injures 4 Boys". The Washington Post. 22 November 1923. 
  4. ^ Janet Kusterer, Victoria Goeller. Ellicott City. p. 47. 
  5. ^ Jamie Smith Hopkins (12 February 2001). "Taylor, county in land talks Two sides discussing property options for elementary school". The Baltimore Sun. 
  6. ^ Frank J. Ayd. Lexicon of Psychiatry, Neurology, and the Neurosciences. 
  7. ^ Jamie Smith Hopkins (12 February 2001). "Taylor, county in land talks Two sides discussing property options for elementary school". The Baltimore Sun. 
  8. ^ Sabrina Jones (27 June 2002). "End of a Hospital's Family Era; Psychiatric Facility To Change Hands". The Washington Post. 
  9. ^ Larry Carson (22 September 2006). "Crisis center moving, for now Grassroots is going to Ellicott City while new facility is built". The Baltimore Sun. 
  10. ^ Margret Right Wise. Ellicott City. p. 125. 
  11. ^ "Light Shines on Howard hospital". The Baltimore Sun. 31 August 1997. 
  12. ^ Howard Padwa, Jacob Cunningham. Addiction: A Reference Encyclopedia. p. 116. 
  13. ^ "Sheppard Pratt History". Retrieved 26 August 2013. 
  14. ^ "Light Shines on Howard hospital". The Baltimore Sun. 31 August 1997. 
  15. ^ Sherry Joe (22 April 1994). "Taylor Manor holding 25th symposium today". The Baltimore Sun. 
  16. ^ "PROGRAM ADDRESSES RELIGIOUS NEEDs". Psot Tribune. 23 November 1991. 
  17. ^ Dana Hedgpeth (19 August 1997). "Juvenile sex offender hospital opposed Ellicott City residents launch petition against Taylor Manor proposal". The Baltimore Sun. 
  18. ^ Sabrina Jones (27 June 2002). "End of a Hospital's Family Era; Psychiatric Facility To Change Hands". The Washington Post. 
  19. ^ Frank J. Ayd. Lexicon of Psychiatry, Neurology, and the Neurosciences. 
  20. ^ S. Nassir Ghaemi. Polypharmacy in Psychiatry. 
  21. ^ David Herzberg. Happy Pills in America: From Miltown to Prozac. p. 21. 
  22. ^ Jack Mann (16 February 1986). "Franklin Comes Back Again". Chicago Sun Times. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Affective Disorders Reassessed—1983 Frank J. Ayd, Irving J. Taylor, Bruce T. Taylor (M.D.)