Teatro ZinZanni

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Teatro ZinZanni in San Francisco

Teatro ZinZanni is a circus dinner theater that began in the neighborhood of Lower Queen Anne in Seattle, Washington.[1] It has since expanded to a site on the waterfront at Pier 29 on The Embarcadero in San Francisco, California.

Teatro ZinZanni was created by Norman Langill,[2] and was once described as "the Moulin Rouge meets Cirque du Soleil."[3] The show is a blend of European cabaret, circus arts, fine dining,[4] and vaudeville performed in a Belgian spiegeltent (mirror tent).[5][6] Until mid-2011 the show was produced by the Seattle-based non-profit events company, One Reel. Teatro Zinzanni is now its own non-profit.

Teatro ZinZanni began in Seattle in October 1998 for an eight-week run and ended up playing to sold-out houses until it closed on December 31, 1999. It then moved its operation to San Francisco, opening there in March 2000. In 2002, it re-opened a permanent operation in Seattle's Belltown district. The operation has since moved to Seattle's theatre district on Mercer Street across from Seattle Center. Teatro ZinZanni's San Francisco location closed its operation on December 31, 2011, due to the city's preparation for the America's Cup, but has plan to reopen at another location on the Embarcadero after fund-raising is complete.[7]

The many performers in Teatro ZinZanni productions have included Joan Baez,[8] Yamil Borges, Martha Davis of the rock group The Motels,[1] El Vez,[3] Frank Ferrante,[9][10] Geoff Hoyle,[10] Sally Kellerman,[11][12] Liliane Montevecchi,[9] Maria Muldaur,[13][14] Melanie Stace,[15] and Ann Wilson of the rock group Heart.[3]

Teatro ZinZanni has produced two CDs:[16] The Divas,[9] with Baez, Montevecchi, Kellerman, Thelma Houston and others, and Omnium, a collaboration of TZ Maestro Norm Durkee with Martha Davis.

In addition to Teatro ZinZanni's evening dinner shows, Teatro ZinZanni has introduced a variety of special projects including brunches,[17] late-night cabarets (Cabaret Lunatique, Mezzo Lunatico[17]), a concert series (Mirror Tent Music), children's/family programming (Big Top Rock, "Zirkus Fantazmo"[17]) and offers year-round education opportunities including day camps.[17][18][19]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Charles Campbell (May 26, 2005). "Vaudeville lives in Seattle". Straight. Retrieved 30 September 2011. 
  2. ^ Joe Adcock (June 28, 2004). "The show goes on for Teatro ZinZanni". The Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Retrieved 30 September 2011. 
  3. ^ a b c "Seattle Music Map: An Insider's Guide to Seattle's Music History on". Seattle.gov. Retrieved 30 September 2011. 
  4. ^ M. Sharon Baker (October 15, 2007). "From the plate to the stage, Teatro ZinZanni aims to dazzle diners". Nation's Restaurant News. Retrieved 30 September 2011. 
  5. ^ Mark Blankenship (August 17, 2007). "Audiences get their circus kicks: New 'alternative' productions thriving in U.S". Variety. Retrieved 30 September 2011. 
  6. ^ "The Famous Spiegeltent". Spiegeltent. Retrieved 30 September 2011. 
  7. ^ Stephanie Lee (Dec 6, 2011). "America's Cup: Winds of change on S.F. waterfront". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved 7 December 2011. 
  8. ^ Steve Winn (October 12, 2001). "Now it's Countess Baez". The San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved 30 September 2011. 
  9. ^ a b c Gene Stout (May 18, 2007). "Newest ZinZanni diva is rrrreally rrrraucous". The Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Retrieved 30 September 2011. 
  10. ^ a b Pat Craig (August 30, 2007). "ZinZanni performers ready for anything". The Contra Costa Times. Retrieved 30 September 2011. 
  11. ^ Jesse Hamlin (July 6, 2004). "Actress and stage performer who's been there, done that still wants more". The San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved 30 September 2011. 
  12. ^ Richard Connema (2004). "Sally Kellerman headlines Teatro ZinZanni". Talkin Broadway. Retrieved 30 September 2011. 
  13. ^ Matthew Stafford (March 14, 2001). "Cirque du Supper". SF Weekly. Retrieved 30 September 2011. 
  14. ^ Digital Interviews (October 2000). "Maria Muldaur". Retrieved 30 September 2011. 
  15. ^ Joel Selvin (August 18, 2007). "Review: Melanie Stace is well worth getting to know better". The San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved 30 September 2011. 
  16. ^ Listed in Teatro ZinZanni Boutique Catalog.
  17. ^ a b c d Misha Berson (March 14, 2011). "Seattle's Teatro ZinZanni woos wider audience with brunch, kids shows and more". Seattle Times. Retrieved 7 December 2011. 
  18. ^ Janet Tu (August 9, 2009). "Seattle arts groups get creative to attract younger generations". Seattle Times. Retrieved 7 December 2011. 
  19. ^ R.M. Campbell (August 13, 2008). "Camp ZinZanni lets kids step into the ring". Seattle P-I. Retrieved 7 December 2011. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 37°48′18″N 122°24′09″W / 37.80495°N 122.40253°W / 37.80495; -122.40253