Teeyan

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Teeyan (Punjab/Haryana)
Haryali Teej.jpg
Also called Teej
Observed by Women
Type Monsoon festival/seasonal, religious
Begins Shraavana
Date July/August

Teeyan is the Punjabi name of the festival of Teej which is celebrated in Punjab and Haryana (where it is also called Haryali teej).

Celebration[edit]

The festival is celebrated on the third day of the month of Sawan by women. Married women go to their maternal house to participate in the festivities.[1] In the past, it was traditional for women to spend the whole month of Sawan with their parents.

Gifts[edit]

Whether or not a married woman goes to her parents, brothers take a gift set to their sisters called a 'sandhara'. A sandhara includes a Punjabi Suit/sari, laddoo, bangles, mehndi and a swing.

Gidha and swings[edit]

The festival of teeyan centres on girls and women getting together in the village green and tying swings to the trees. The festival gathers momentum in the teeyan Gidha.

The main focus of the teeyan is dancing Giddha. In the past, the festival would last for as long as the girls wishes ranging from a few days to four weeks. Girls would gather to dance Giddha everday. The festival would close by the women performing the closing dance called 'bhallho'. This tradition of women getting together in villages has now become extinct.[2]

Food[edit]

The food traditionally associated with teeyan is kheer (rice boiled in milk), poorhay (fried bread), halwa and sweat dishes.

Observance[edit]

Punjabis consider teeyan as a seasonal festival. Although the teeyan gatherings are not as common in the villages in Punjab, the festival is observed on a low-key scale, especially in schools and colleges. Government sponsored teeyan festivals are observed at pre-selected sites.[3]

Religion[edit]

For Hindu families, especially in Haryana, the religious rites connected with Teej are also followed as the festival is dedicated to Goddess Parvati.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Alop Ho Raha Punjabi Virsa: Harkesh Singh Kehal
  2. ^ East of Indus: My memories of old Punjab: Gurnam Singh Sidhu Brar [1]
  3. ^ [2] The Tribune 26 08 2012:Amar Nath Wadehra & Randeep Wadehra