Tegeingl

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Perfeddulad.jpg

Tegeingl, in English Englefield,[1] was a cantref in north-east Wales during the medieval period. It was named after the Deceangli, a Celtic tribe of the Iron Age and Roman periods and was incorporated into Flintshire following Edward I of England's conquest of North Wales in the 13th century.

Etymology[edit]

The region's name was derived from the Deceangli, an Iron Age Celtic tribe with its origins in Ireland and which had inhabited the region since the 1st century BC.[2]

Location[edit]

The cantred formed the eastern part of Perfeddwlad (or Y Berfeddwlad) on the northern coast of Wales between the River Clwyd and Deeside. The territory is roughly equivalent to the modern county of Flintshire today.

History[edit]

Comprising the three commotes of Rhuddlan, Prestatyn and Cwnsyllt (or Coleshill),[3] the territory originally formed part of the Kingdom of Gwynedd, until in the late 8th century it was conquered by the Anglo-Saxon Kingdom of Mercia. It remained under Mercian (or English control) for over three centuries until Dafydd ab Owain Gwynedd recovered it in the 12th century.[3] Edwin of Tegeingl (d.1073) was in the 11th century described as "lord" or "prince" of Tegeingl.[3] He was succeeded as lord of Tegeingl by his son Owain who supported the Anglo-Normans' invasion of North Wales in the 1090s.[4] The family remained powerful in North Wales until Owain's sons were killed in 1125 by a son of Gruffudd ap Cynan, Prince of Gwynedd.[5]

It then changed hands several times between England and Gwynedd,[6] but was eventually seized by Edward I as part of his conquest of the Principality of Wales between 1277 and 1283. It was then incorporated into the county of Flintshire by the Statute of Rhuddlan.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ David Walker (2000). The Age of Conquest: Wales 1063-1415: Vol 2. p. 12. ISBN 978-0198208785. 
  2. ^ http://www.historyfiles.co.uk/KingListsBritain/BritainDeceangli.htm
  3. ^ a b c Sir William Llewelyn Davies. "Edwin of Tegeingl". Dictionary of Welsh Biography. National Library of Wales. Retrieved 15 December 2012. 
  4. ^ Professor Thomas Jones Pierce. "Owain ab Edwin". Dictionary of Welsh Biography. National Library of Wales. Retrieved 15 December 2012. 
  5. ^ Wilcott, Darrell "The Ancestry of Edwin of Tegeingl"
  6. ^ David Walker (1990). Medieval Wales. p. 25. ISBN 978-0521311533. 
  7. ^ J. Graham Jones (January 1990). The history of Wales: a pocket guide. University of Wales Press. p. 32. ISBN 978-0-7083-1076-2. Retrieved 2 March 2011.