Tegin

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Tegin (aka tigin, tiğin, Pin. teqin, tiin 特勤, erroneous tèlè 鐵勒[1] ) is a Turkic title, commonly attachable to the names of the junior members of the Khan family. [2] History recorded many personages carrying the title Tegin, from incidentally noted to heading their own states. The most known are Kül Tegin (Ch. Queteqin 闕特勤, erroneous Quētèlè 闕特勒[3]), famous for the stele in his memory in Khöshöö-Tsaidam; a founder Alp Tigin of the Ghazna state which grew into the Ghaznavid Empire; Arslan Tegin and Bughra Tegin instrumental in the creation of the Kara-Khanid Kaganate. The Chinese annals Beishi (History of Northern dynasties) states that Hephthalite king of the Gandhara state was from a ruling clan of the neighboring Tegin state. [4] With time, the title tegin became a popular personal name, and now perseveres both as personal and family name, predominantly in the South Asia and Middle East areas.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sanping Chen, "Son of Heaven and Son of God: Interactions among Ancient Asiatic Cultures regarding Sacral Kingship and Theophoric Names", Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, Third Series, Vol. 12, No. 3 (Nov., 2002), p. 296: Writing 勒 instead of 勤 is a common script error in current editions of almost all dynastic histories
  2. ^ Taskin V.S. "Materials on history of Dunhu group nomadic tribes", Moscow, 1984, p. 432
  3. ^ Sanping Chen, "Son of Heaven and Son of God: Interactions among Ancient Asiatic Cultures regarding Sacral Kingship and Theophoric Names", Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, Third Series, Vol. 12, No. 3 (Nov., 2002), p. 296, note on misspelling
  4. ^ Zuev Yu.A. "The strongest tribe Esgil" //Materials of International Round Table, Almaty, 2004, p.44, ISBN 9965-699-14-3