Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art

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Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art
موزه هنرهای معاصر تهران
Contemporary arts tehran.jpg
Established 1977
Location Laleh Park, Tehran, Iran
Coordinates 35°42′40″N 51°23′25″E / 35.7112°N 51.3904°E / 35.7112; 51.3904Coordinates: 35°42′40″N 51°23′25″E / 35.7112°N 51.3904°E / 35.7112; 51.3904
Director Ehsan Aghaei
Website www.tehranmoca.com

The Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art, Persian: موزه هنرهای معاصر تهران‎, is an art museum in Tehran, Iran.

The museum was designed by Iranian architect Kamran Diba, who employed elements from traditional Persian architecture. It was built adjacent to Laleh Park, Tehran, and was inaugurated in 1977. The building itself can be regarded as an example of contemporary art. Most of the museum area is located underground.

Garden of Sculptures, near the museum

It is considered to have the most valuable collection of Western modern art outside Europe and the United States, a collection largely assembled by founding curators David Galloway and Donna Stein under the patronage of Farah Pahlavi.[1][2] It is said that there is approximately £2.5 billion worth of modern art held at the museum.[3] The museum hosts a revolving programme of exhibitions and occasionally organises exhibitions by local artists.

Artists represented[edit]

At Eternity's Gate by Vincent van Gogh, lithograph, 1882, Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dehghan, Saeed Kamali. “Former queen of Iran on assembling Tehran's art collection.” The Guardian. 1 August 2012: Print.
  2. ^ Iran Keeps Picassos in basement. LA Times. Kim Murphy. 19 September 2007.
  3. ^ http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2007/oct/29/artnews.iran
  4. ^ a b "At Eternity's Gate", vggallery.com. Last Retrieved 19 October 2011.
  5. ^ Alberto Giacometti, Standing Woman, tmoca.com.
  6. ^ Alberto Giacometti, Walking Man 1, tmoca.com.
  7. ^ Max Ernst, Capricorn, tmoca.com.
  8. ^ René Magritte, The Therapeutae, tmoca.com.
  9. ^ Henry Moore, Two–Pieces Reclining Figure, tmoca.com.
  10. ^ Henry Moore, Three–Pieces Reclining Figure, tmoca.com.
  11. ^ http://www.tmoca.com/section14/page11.aspx?lang=Fa
  12. ^ http://www.grafjo.ir/gonagon/295.html
  13. ^ Parviz Tanavoli, Sanctified 1, tmoca.com.