Teispids

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Teispids (ca. mid-7th century BC- 522 BC) (چیشپیشیان) were an Iron Age dynasty originally ruling southern Zagros, in ancient Anshan. The dynasty’s realm was later expanded under Cyrus II who conquered a vast area in southwestern Asia, later happened to be known as Achaemenid empire under Darius I. The titulary of Teispids is recorded in Cyrus Cylender, in which Cyrus II identifies himself and his ancestors with the title King of Anshan, as an Elamite tradition. Teispes being the eponymous ancestor and founder, the dynasty furthermore included Cyrus I, Cambyses I, Cyrus II, Cambyses II and Bardiya.[1] According to Maria Brosius and Bruce Lincoln, the Teispid line was succeeded by the Achaemenids with Darius I seizing the throne, after killing the last members of the Teispids. To legitimate his claim to the throne Darius attempted to construct a lineage through common ancestry to the Teispid kings. [2] [3] To do so he created the impression that they were Achaemenids. He did so by means of inscriptions. He presented Cyrus II as a member of Achaemenids, in the Pasargadae inscriptions (CMa). All of these inscriptions which are dated back ca. 510 repeating "I am Cyrus the King, an Achaemenian". In Behistun inscription Darius created the image of a double line of royal rulers through a common ancestor named Teispes, and a putative eponymous ancestor Achaemenes. [2] [3]

Even if Darius had a Teispes among his ancestors, he has been a man with the same name as great-grandfather of Cyrus II. Indeed there is no text that Darius' father was a king. [4]


References[edit]

  1. ^ Stronach, David "Anshan and Parsa: Early Achaemenid History, Art and Architecture on the Iranian Plateau". In: John Curtis, ed., Mesopotamia and Iran in the Persian Period: Conquest and Imperialism 539–331, 35–53. London: British Museum Press 1997. (see page: 38
  2. ^ a b Women in Ancient Persia, 559-331 BC, Maria Brosius, publisher by Oxford University Press, 1998, ISBN 0-19-815255-8, ISBN 978-0-19-815255-2, 258 pages, see pages : 14-15
  3. ^ a b Bruce Lincoln. Religion, empire, and torture: the case of Achaemenian Persia, 2007, University of Chicago Press , Page 4-5
  4. ^ From Cyrus to Alexander: A History of the Persian Empire, Briant Pierre, (originally Publisher in French 1996), translated by Peter T. Daniels, published by EISENBRAUNS, 2006, ISBN 1-57506-120-1, ISBN 978-1-57506-120-7, see page: 110
  • Visual representation of the divine and the numinous in early Achaemenid Iran: old problems, new directions; Mark A. Garrison, Trinity University, San Antonio, TX; last revision: 3 March 2009, see page: 9