Template:Infobox meitnerium

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Meitnerium
109Mt
Hydrogen (diatomic nonmetal)
Helium (noble gas)
Lithium (alkali metal)
Beryllium (alkaline earth metal)
Boron (metalloid)
Carbon (polyatomic nonmetal)
Nitrogen (diatomic nonmetal)
Oxygen (diatomic nonmetal)
Fluorine (diatomic nonmetal)
Neon (noble gas)
Sodium (alkali metal)
Magnesium (alkaline earth metal)
Aluminium (other metals)
Silicon (metalloid)
Phosphorus (polyatomic nonmetal)
Sulfur (polyatomic nonmetal)
Chlorine (diatomic nonmetal)
Argon (noble gas)
Potassium (alkali metal)
Calcium (alkaline earth metal)
Scandium (transition metal)
Titanium (transition metal)
Vanadium (transition metal)
Chromium (transition metal)
Manganese (transition metal)
Iron (transition metal)
Cobalt (transition metal)
Nickel (transition metal)
Copper (transition metal)
Zinc (transition metal)
Gallium (other metals)
Germanium (metalloid)
Arsenic (metalloid)
Selenium (polyatomic nonmetal)
Bromine (diatomic nonmetal)
Krypton (noble gas)
Rubidium (alkali metal)
Strontium (alkaline earth metal)
Yttrium (transition metal)
Zirconium (transition metal)
Niobium (transition metal)
Molybdenum (transition metal)
Technetium (transition metal)
Ruthenium (transition metal)
Rhodium (transition metal)
Palladium (transition metal)
Silver (transition metal)
Cadmium (transition metal)
Indium (other metals)
Tin (other metals)
Antimony (metalloid)
Tellurium (metalloid)
Iodine (diatomic nonmetal)
Xenon (noble gas)
Caesium (alkali metal)
Barium (alkaline earth metal)
Lanthanum (lanthanide)
Cerium (lanthanide)
Praseodymium (lanthanide)
Neodymium (lanthanide)
Promethium (lanthanide)
Samarium (lanthanide)
Europium (lanthanide)
Gadolinium (lanthanide)
Terbium (lanthanide)
Dysprosium (lanthanide)
Holmium (lanthanide)
Erbium (lanthanide)
Thulium (lanthanide)
Ytterbium (lanthanide)
Lutetium (lanthanide)
Hafnium (transition metal)
Tantalum (transition metal)
Tungsten (transition metal)
Rhenium (transition metal)
Osmium (transition metal)
Iridium (transition metal)
Platinum (transition metal)
Gold (transition metal)
Mercury (transition metal)
Thallium (other metals)
Lead (other metals)
Bismuth (other metals)
Polonium (other metals)
Astatine (metalloid)
Radon (noble gas)
Francium (alkali metal)
Radium (alkaline earth metal)
Actinium (actinide)
Thorium (actinide)
Protactinium (actinide)
Uranium (actinide)
Neptunium (actinide)
Plutonium (actinide)
Americium (actinide)
Curium (actinide)
Berkelium (actinide)
Californium (actinide)
Einsteinium (actinide)
Fermium (actinide)
Mendelevium (actinide)
Nobelium (actinide)
Lawrencium (actinide)
Rutherfordium (transition metal)
Dubnium (transition metal)
Seaborgium (transition metal)
Bohrium (transition metal)
Hassium (transition metal)
Meitnerium (unknown chemical properties)
Darmstadtium (unknown chemical properties)
Roentgenium (unknown chemical properties)
Copernicium (transition metal)
Ununtrium (unknown chemical properties)
Flerovium (unknown chemical properties)
Ununpentium (unknown chemical properties)
Livermorium (unknown chemical properties)
Ununseptium (unknown chemical properties)
Ununoctium (unknown chemical properties)
Ir

Mt

(Uhu)
hassiummeitneriumdarmstadtium
Meitnerium in the periodic table
Appearance
unknown
General properties
Name, symbol, number meitnerium, Mt, 109
Pronunciation /mtˈnɪəriəm/ myt-NEER-ee-əm[1]
or /ˈmtnəriəm/ MYT-nər-ee-əm[2]
Element category unknown
but probably a transition metal[3][4]
Group, period, block 9, 7, d
Standard atomic weight [278]
Electron configuration [Rn] 5f14 6d7 7s2
(calculated)[3][5]
2, 8, 18, 32, 32, 15, 2
(predicted)
Physical properties
Phase solid (predicted)[4]
Density (near r.t.) 37.4 (predicted)[3] g·cm−3
Atomic properties
Oxidation states 9, 8, 6, 4, 3, 1 (predicted)[3][6][7]
Ionization energies
(more)
1st: 800.8 (estimated)[3] kJ·mol−1
2nd: 1823.6 (estimated)[3] kJ·mol−1
3rd: 2904.2 (estimated)[3] kJ·mol−1
Atomic radius 128 (predicted)[3][8] pm
Covalent radius 129 (estimated)[9] pm
Miscellanea
Crystal structure face-centered cubic (predicted)[4]
Meitnerium has a face-centered cubic crystal structure
Magnetic ordering paramagnetic (predicted)[10]
CAS registry number 54038-01-6
History
Naming after Lise Meitner
Discovery Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (1982)
Most stable isotopes
Main article: Isotopes of meitnerium
iso NA half-life DM DE (MeV) DP
278Mt syn 7.6 s α 9.6 274Bh
276Mt syn 0.72 s α 9.71 272Bh
274Mt syn 0.44 s α 9.76 270Bh
270mMt ? syn 1.1 s α 266Bh
only isotopes with half-lives over 0.1 seconds are included here
· references

References

  1. ^ Emsley, John (2003). Nature's Building Blocks. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0198503408. Retrieved 12 November 2012. 
  2. ^ "Meitnerium". Periodic Table of Videos. The University of Nottingham. Retrieved 15 October 2012. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h Haire, Richard G. (2006). "Transactinides and the future elements". In Morss; Edelstein, Norman M.; Fuger, Jean. The Chemistry of the Actinide and Transactinide Elements (3rd ed.). Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer Science+Business Media. ISBN 1-4020-3555-1. 
  4. ^ a b c Östlin, A.; Vitos, L. (2011). "First-principles calculation of the structural stability of 6d transition metals". Physical Review B 84 (11). Bibcode:2011PhRvB..84k3104O. doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.84.113104. 
  5. ^ Thierfelder, C.; Schwerdtfeger, P.; Heßberger, F. P.; Hofmann, S. (2008). "Dirac-Hartree-Fock studies of X-ray transitions in meitnerium". The European Physical Journal A 36 (2): 227. Bibcode:2008EPJA...36..227T. doi:10.1140/epja/i2008-10584-7. 
  6. ^ Ionova, G. V.; Ionova, I. S.; Mikhalko, V. K.; Gerasimova, G. A.; Kostrubov, Yu. N.; Suraeva, N. I. (2004). "Halides of Tetravalent Transactinides (Rf, Db, Sg, Bh, Hs, Mt, 110th Element): Physicochemical Properties". Russian Journal of Coordination Chemistry 30 (5): 352. doi:10.1023/B:RUCO.0000026006.39497.82. 
  7. ^ Himmel, Daniel; Knapp, Carsten; Patzschke, Michael; Riedel, Sebastian (2010). "How Far Can We Go? Quantum-Chemical Investigations of Oxidation State +IX". ChemPhysChem 11 (4): 865–9. doi:10.1002/cphc.200900910. PMID 20127784. 
  8. ^ Fricke, Burkhard (1975). "Superheavy elements: a prediction of their chemical and physical properties". Recent Impact of Physics on Inorganic Chemistry 21: 89–144. doi:10.1007/BFb0116498. Retrieved 4 October 2013. 
  9. ^ Chemical Data. Meitnerium - Mt, Royal Chemical Society
  10. ^ Saito, Shiro L. (2009). "Hartree–Fock–Roothaan energies and expectation values for the neutral atoms He to Uuo: The B-spline expansion method". Atomic Data and Nuclear Data Tables 95 (6): 836. Bibcode:2009ADNDT..95..836S. doi:10.1016/j.adt.2009.06.001.