Template talk:British cuisine

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WikiProject United Kingdom (Rated Template-class)
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Comments[edit]

Scottish cuisine is the specific set of cooking traditions and practices associated with Scotland. It shares much with wider British cuisine but has distinctive attributes and recipes of its own, as a result of foreign and local influences both ancient and modern. Traditional Scottish dishes exist alongside international foodstuffs brought about by migration.

Scotland's natural larder of game, dairy, fish, fruit, and vegetables is the integral factor in traditional Scots cooking, with a high reliance on simplicity and a lack of spices from abroad, which were often very expensive. While many inveterate dishes such as Scotch broth are considered healthy, many common dishes are rich in fat, contributes to the high rates of heart disease and obesity in the country. In recent times greater importance has been placed on the consumption of fresh fruit and vegetables, but many Scots, particularly those of low incomes, continue to have extremely poor diets, which contributes to Scotland's relatively high mortality rate from coronary heart disease.[1]

Despite this, Scottish cuisine is enjoying a renaissance. As of 2006, nine restaurants with Michelin stars, served traditional or fusion cuisine made with local ingredients. In most towns, Chinese and Indian take-away restaurants exist along with traditional fish and chip shops. Larger towns and cities offer cuisine ranging from Thai and Japanese to Mexican, Polish or Turkish.

Suggested move[edit]

I suggest we move the template to Template:British cuisine as the term Britain is ambiguous. As it stands the template already presents itself as such. Furthermore, Irish cuisine should be removed from the template, as Ireland is a separate country altogether. Northern Irish cuisine would apply if such article existed. Comments? --Gibmetal 77talk 19:31, 26 October 2009 (UTC)

Image[edit]

The current image is hideous. I switched it yesterday and was promptly reverted (no explanation in the edit summary). I noticed then that thrice before in the last year it has been changed or removed and then reverted: on 4 Feb., 4 Feb., and 21 May. Once the image was removed as "unhelpful" and because "scone cream is a German ... food", which it is not. When the image was removed because "Navigation templates are not arbitrarily decorative", it was reverted without explanation. I thought my version was pretty good. Would the editors monitoring this page for changes to the image like to explain what redeeming feature the current image has? The words "British cuisine" appear atop the template and are not needed in the image (as they are not on most such templates). Srnec (talk) 00:47, 26 February 2013 (UTC)

I think we should just remove the image completely, since it is (1) decoration and (2) there is no single image to represent British cuisine. Frietjes (talk) 16:13, 26 February 2013 (UTC)
I agree with removing it. Remember this? Template talk:American cuisine/Archive 1#Images in regional cuisine food templates: inclusion vs. exclusion Anna Frodesiak (talk) 16:38, 26 February 2013 (UTC)

Irish cuisine[edit]

For some unclear reason someone is trying to remove Irish cuisine from this template. Unfortunately, that means completely ignoring what is the local cuisine in Ulster. The famous Ulster fry is not British cuisine, but it is Irish cuisine made and served in that part of the United Kingdom that is located on the island of Ireland. The Banner talk 20:46, 20 May 2013 (UTC)