Template talk:Events leading to US Civil War

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Notes[edit]

This is a rather peculiar list. The Northwest Ordinance? Really? It also excludes a lot of stuff from 1845-1861 that should be included. The annexation of Texas? The Mexican-American War? the formation of the Republican Party? The Lecompton constitution? Most importantly, the election of 1860, the actual secession of the southern states, the formation of the CSA, and the firing on Fort Sumter should certainly be on the template. john k (talk) 14:21, 1 April 2008 (UTC)

I agree. Though the Lecompton constitution sort of falls under Bleeding Kansas. Texas and the Mexican War should definitely be on there. Roscelese (talk) 18:18, 25 April 2008 (UTC)
I can't believe Dred Scott decision isn't in there -- from the list I saw. Any high school student should know the importance of Dred Scott decision, if for no other reason than propelling Lincoln in the election, and polarizing the nation. Lincoln talked repeatedly about how Dred Scott decision meant all the states would be slave states, or free states -- it was a HUGE issue to him. So when he said we would all be free, or all slave, he meant it literally, in the sense that all the states would be slave states, or free states.
That was a major issue on Lincoln's mind -- and he was right. Dred Scott made it inevitable that the NORTHERN states would have to allow slavery. Without Dred Scott decision was supposed to settle the issue -- thats why Taney made the decision so extreme, to settle it. Instead, he lit the fuse that started the civil war. — Preceding unsigned comment added by MarkMorton (talkcontribs) 14:26, 12 May 2008

John Brown's Raid, Anyone?[edit]

This is pretty much a slam dunk for this list, just as you have correctly added Dred Scott. I wouldn't include the actual results of these listed incidents though; i.e., the secession of states, the firing on Fort Sumter, etc., or long standing historical trends, like the slave trade itself.Ismaelbobo (talk) 13:25, 15 November 2008 (UTC)


Jolly good show, chap. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 173.9.19.185 (talk) 12:19, 20 May 2010 (UTC)

Add Entry[edit]

The Fugitive Slave Act article should be added here, as I believe that there is enough information there to have it be a seperate entry from the Compromise of 1850. What do you think? <font color=#FF0000>R</font><font color=#FF6600>i</font><font color=#EFEF00>k</font><font color=#00FF00>i</font><font color=#0000FF>n</font><font color=#990099>g</font><font color=#888888>2</font><font color=#000000>7</font> (talk) 18:10, 23 March 2009 (UTC)