Ten Days in a Mad-House

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Ten Days in a Mad-House
Madhousecvr.jpg
Author Nellie Bly
Country United States
Language English
Genre Investigative journalism
Publisher Ian L. Munro
Publication date
1887
Media type Print (hardback and paperback)
Pages 96

Ten Days in a Mad-House is a book by newspaper reporter Nellie Bly. It was initially published as a series of articles for the New York World. Bly later compiled the articles into a book, which was published by Ian L. Munro in New York City in 1887.[1][2] The book comprised Bly's reportage for the New York World while on an undercover assignment in which she feigned insanity at a women's boarding house, so as to be involuntarily committed to the Blackwell's Island Insane Asylum. She then investigated the reports of brutality and neglect at the Women's Lunatic Asylum on Blackwell's Island.[2]

Reception[edit]

The book's graphic depiction of conditions at the asylum caused a sensation which brought Bly lasting fame and prompted a grand jury to launch its own investigation with Bly assisting. The jury's report resulted in an $850,000 increase in the budget of the Department of Public Charities and Corrections.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bill DeMain. "Ten Days in a Madhouse: The Woman Who Got Herself Committed". mental floss. Retrieved 2013-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b TIME Staff (2009-04-12). "Top 10 Literary Stunts". Time. Retrieved 2013-04-23. 

External links[edit]