Tennessee's 5th congressional district

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Tennessee's 5th congressional district
Current Representative Jim Cooper (DNashville)
Population (2000) 632,143
Median income $40,419
Ethnicity 70.0% White, 23.6% Black, 2.0% Asian, 4.2% Hispanic, 0.3% Native American, 0.2% other
Cook PVI D+5[1]

The 5th Congressional District of Tennessee is a congressional district in Middle Tennessee. The most regularly drawn of the state's nine districts, it includes all of Davidson and Dickson counties and most of Cheatham County. Nearly two-thirds of the district's voting population lives in the state capital, Nashville.

Democrat Jim Cooper, who represented the 4th District in southern middle Tennessee for six terms, has represented the 5th since 2003.

The district from 2003 to 2013

Political characteristics[edit]

The 5th is historically a very safe seat for the Democratic Party, due almost entirely to the influence of heavily Democratic Nashville. Some pockets of Republican influence exist in Belle Meade, and portions of neighboring Cheatham and Wilson counties undergoing rapid suburbanization. However, they are no match for the overwhelming Democratic trend in most of Nashville. While Republicans made several strong bids for the district in the late 1960s and early 1970s (largely over racial issues such as a 1971 busing order), they have only put up token candidates since 1972.

Demographics are a major factor behind the Democrats' near-absolute dominance of the political scene. Many conservative white voters (including Nashville natives) have increasingly moved out of Metro Nashville/Davidson County to more Republican suburban counties such as Williamson and Sumner. They have been replaced largely by liberal-oriented constituencies such as students (and alumni) of the Nashville area's several colleges and universities, music industry professionals, and white-collar professionals, in a manner similar to that of cities such as Atlanta, Houston, Charlotte, Raleigh/Durham, and Austin. In the entire state, only Memphis has a comparable constituency of liberal-minded whites. The clout of Nashville's African-American electorate, a traditionally Democratic constituency, has grown steadily in recent years as well.

Although the district's Cook Partisan Voting Index of D+5 suggests a marginally Democratic district, Davidson County has more people than the rest of the district combined. For this reason, the 5th is one of two seats in Tennessee that are usually not seriously contested by Republicans (the other being the 9th district).

History of district boundaries[edit]

Tennessee has had at least five congressional districts since 1827. The district's current configuration dates from 1951, when Tennessee lost a seat in redistricting. The Tennessee General Assembly shifted most of the territory of the former 6th District to neighboring districts, creating a 5th District located entirely in Davidson County. While other areas around Nashville have been added in subsequent years, the 5th has been drawn as a Nashville-based district ever since.

Below are the counties included in Tennessee District 5 from 1921 to 2000:

  • 1921-1930: Bedford, Cannon, Coffee, DeKalb, Lincoln, Marshall, Moore, Rutherford
  • 1931-1940: Davidson, Macon, Montgomery, Robertson, Stewart, Sumner, Trousdale
  • 1941-1950: Bedford, Cannon, Coffee, DeKalb, Franklin, Giles, Lincoln, Marshall, Moore, Rutherford, Wilson
  • 1951-1970: Davidson
  • 1971-1980: Cheatham, Davidson, Robertson
  • 1981-1990: Davidson and Robertson
  • 1991-2000: Davidson and most of Robertson

Source: Tennessee Blue Books

List of representatives[edit]

Name Took Office Left Office Party District Residence Notes
District created March 4, 1813
Felix Grundy Mar 4, 1813 1814 Democratic-Republican Redistricted from the 3rd district, Resigned
Newton Cannon Sep 16, 1814 Mar 3, 1817 Democratic-Republican
Thomas Claiborne Mar 4, 1817 Mar 3, 1819 Democratic-Republican
Newton Cannon Mar 4, 1819 Mar 3, 1823 Democratic-Republican
Robert Allen Mar 4, 1823 Mar 3, 1825 Jacksonian D-R Redistricted from the 4th district
Mar 4, 1825 Mar 3, 1827 Jacksonian
Robert Desha Mar 4, 1827 Mar 3, 1831 Jacksonian Gallatin
William Hall Mar 4, 1831 Mar 3, 1833 Jacksonian Sumner County
John B. Forester Mar 4, 1833 Mar 3, 1835 Jacksonian
Mar 4, 1835 Mar 3, 1837 Anti-Jacksonian
Hopkins L. Turney Mar 4, 1837 Mar 3, 1843 Democratic Winchester
George Washington Jones Mar 4, 1843 Mar 3, 1853 Democratic Fayetteville Redistricted to the 6th district
Charles Ready Mar 4, 1853 Mar 3, 1855 Whig Murfreesboro
Mar 4, 1855 Mar 3, 1859 Know Nothing
Robert H. Hatton Mar 4, 1859 Mar 4, 1861 Opposition Lebanon
American Civil War
William B. Campbell Jul 24, 1866 Mar 3, 1867 Unionist Wilson County
John Trimble Mar 4, 1867 Mar 3, 1869 Republican Nashville
William F. Prosser Mar 4, 1869 Mar 3, 1871 Republican Nashville
Edward I. Golladay Mar 4, 1871 Mar 3, 1873 Democratic Lebanon
Horace Harrison Mar 4, 1873 Mar 3, 1875 Republican Nashville
John M. Bright Mar 4, 1875 Mar 3, 1881 Democratic Fayetteville Redistricted from the 4th district
Richard Warner Mar 4, 1881 Mar 3, 1885 Democratic Lewisburg
James D. Richardson Mar 4, 1885 Mar 3, 1905 Democratic Murfreesboro
William C. Houston Mar 4, 1905 Mar 3, 1919 Democratic Woodbury
Ewin L. Davis Mar 4, 1919 Mar 3, 1933 Democratic Tullahoma
Jo Byrns Mar 4, 1933 Jun 4, 1936 Democratic Nashville Redistricted from the 6th district, Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1935–1936, Died
Richard M. Atkinson Jan 3, 1937 Jan 3, 1939 Democratic Nashville
Jo Byrns, Jr. Jan 3, 1939 Jan 3, 1941 Democratic Nashville
Percy Priest Jan 3, 1941 Jan 3, 1943 Independent Democrat Nashville Redistricted to the 6th district
Jim Nance McCord Jan 3, 1943 Jan 3, 1945 Democratic Lewisburg
Harold Earthman Jan 3, 1945 Jan 3, 1947 Democratic Murfreesboro
Joe L. Evins Jan 3, 1947 Jan 3, 1953 Democratic Smithville Redistricted to the 4th district
Percy Priest Jan 3, 1953 Oct 12, 1956 Democratic Nashville Redistricted from the 6th district, Died
J. Carlton Loser Jan 3, 1957 Jan 3, 1963 Democratic Nashville
Richard Fulton Jan 3, 1963 Aug 14, 1975 Democratic Nashville Resigned after becoming Mayor of Nashville
Clifford Allen Nov 25, 1975 Jun 18, 1978 Democratic Nashville Died
Bill Boner Jan 3, 1979 Oct 5, 1987 Democratic Nashville Resigned after becoming Mayor of Nashville
Bob Clement Jan 19, 1988 Jan 3, 2003 Democratic Nashville
Jim Cooper Jan 3, 2003 Present Democratic Nashville

Election results[edit]

United States House elections, 2004: Tennessee District 5
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Jim Cooper 168,970 69.3 +5.5
Republican Scott Knapp 74,978 30.7 -2.5
Write-in candidate Thomas F. Kovach 15 0.0

Source: Statistics of the Presidential and Congressional Election of November 2, 2004

United States House elections, 2006: Tennessee District 5
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Jim Cooper 122,919 69.0 -0.3
Republican Thomas F. Kovach 49,702 27.9 -2.8
Independent Ginny Welsch 3,766 2.1
Independent Scott Knapp 1,755 1.0
United States House elections, 2008: Tennessee District 5
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Jim Cooper 181,467 65.8 -3.2
Republican Gerard Donovan 85,471 31.0 +3.1
Independent Jon Jackson 5,464 2.0
Green John Miglietta 3,196 1.2
Write-in candidate Thomas F. Kovach 4 0.0
United States House elections, 2010: Tennessee District 5
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Jim Cooper 99,162 56.2 -9.6
Republican David Hall 74,204 42.1 +11.1
Libertarian Stephen Collings 584 .3
Independent John "Big John" Smith 533 .3
Independent Jackie Miller 444 .3
Green John Miglietta 396 .2 -1
Independent Bill Crook 391 .2
Independent James Whitfield 333 .2
Independent Joe Moore 159 .1
Independent Clark Taylor 156 .1

Source: TN Department of State

United States House elections, 2012: Tennessee District 5 (Unofficial)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Jim Cooper 171,358 65.22 +9.0
Republican Brad Staats 86,153 32.79 -9.3
Green John Miglietta 5,208 1.98 +1.8

Source: TN Department of State

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Partisan Voting Index Districts of the 113th Congress: 2004 & 2008". The Cook Political Report. 2012. Retrieved 2013-01-10. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 36°11′14″N 87°04′27″W / 36.18722°N 87.07417°W / 36.18722; -87.07417