Terri Gibbs

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For the male jazz artist, see Terry Gibbs.
Terri Gibbs
Birth name Teresa Fay Gibbs[1]
Born (1954-06-15) June 15, 1954 (age 60)[1]
Origin Miami, Florida, U.S.
Genres Country, Christian
Occupation(s) Singer
Instruments Vocals, keyboards[1]
Years active 1980–present
Labels MCA, Warner Bros., Canaan, Morning Gate
Associated acts Ed Penney, George Jones

Teresa Fay "Terri" Gibbs (born June 15, 1954) is an American country music artist who was born blind. Between 1980 and 1990, she recorded seven studio albums, including four for MCA Records and one for Warner Bros. Records. She also charted thirteen singles on the Billboard country singles charts in that timespan, including her debut single "Somebody's Knockin'", which reached No. 8 on the country charts, No. 13 on the pop charts and No. 3 on the Adult Contemporary charts. She also entered the country top 20 with "Rich Man", "Mis'ry River", "Ashes to Ashes" and "Anybody Else's Heart but Mine."

Biography[edit]

Teresa Fay Gibbs was born in Miami, Florida but raised in the Augusta, Georgia suburb of Grovetown.[1] Born blind, she learned to play piano at age three.[1] As a child, she sang in the church choir and at talent contests, and at age seventeen, she opened for Bill Anderson.[2] Her parents wanted her to be treated no differently from sighted people and she was sent to public school, graduating from Butler High School in Augusta in 1972.[3] She performed in and around the Augusta area and eventually, she met Chet Atkins, who advised her to move to Nashville, Tennessee to pursue a country music career, which she did at age eighteen.[1] After failing to find a record deal, she returned to Miami and joined a band called Sound Dimension.[1] She continued to perform locally, later forming a band called the Terri Gibbs Trio, which performed at a Steak & Ale in Augusta, Georgia.[2] Gibbs then sent a demo tape to record producer Ed Penney of MCA Records, signing to the label in 1980.[1] Penney was a former Boston disc jockey and a long-time songwriter. He liked her voice on her demo, but felt she needed stronger material. He co-wrote "Somebody's Knockin'" for her and also produced the song.[4]

Musical career[edit]

Gibbs' first single release was "Somebody's Knockin'", which was also the title of her 1981 debut album. This song was a crossover hit upon its 1980 release, reaching No. 8 on the U.S. country charts, No. 13 on the Billboard Hot 100 and No. 3 on the Adult Contemporary charts.[5] It was followed by "Rich Man", a No. 19 country hit which also entered the pop charts.[5] Her debut album won her the Academy of Country Music's Top New Female Vocalist award.[1] She was also the first winner of the Country Music Association's Horizon Award (which is awarded to emerging artists),[6] and was nominated for a Grammy Award for Best Country Song for "Somebody's Knockin'."[2] Gibbs performed on the Grand Ole Opry as well.[2]

MCA released her second album, I'm a Lady, later in 1981. This album was less successful,[1] although it produced a No. 12 hit in "Mis'ry River,"[5] its second and final single. 1982's Some Days It Rains All Night Long produced a Top 20 hit in "Ashes to Ashes" and a No. 45 in its title track.[7] Also in 1981 and 1982, Gibbs toured with George Jones and sang duets with him onstage.[1] Her final MCA album, Over Easy, also produced a minor hit in "Anybody Else's Heart but Mine", and after releasing a compilation called The Best of Terri Gibbs, she left the label.[8]

Gibbs switched to Warner Bros. Records for her fifth album, 1985's Old Friends.[9] All three of this album's singles — "A Few Good Men" (which featured Kathy Mattea on backing vocals[7]) "Rockin' in a Brand New Cradle" and "Someone Must Be Missing You Tonight" — missed the country Top 40.[7]

Gibbs later shifted her focus to Contemporary Christian music, recording Turn Around and Comfort the People in 1987 and 1988, respectively, on Canaan Records.[8] The former gave Gibbs her second Grammy nomination.[8] What a Great Day, her third Christian album, followed in 1990 on the Morning Gate label.[8] Gibbs then retired from the music industry.[1]

Personal life[edit]

Gibbs married Grovetown, Georgia city councilman David Daughtry on April 28, 1988, and remained married to him until his death in February 2008.[8][10] They had one son, David Wayne Daughtry II, born October 20, 1989.[10]

Awards and honors[edit]

Gibbs has won several industry awards. She won Academy of Country Music's Best New Female Vocalist and the Country Music Association's inaugural Horizon Award (for artists rising to new levels of prominence).[11] Gibbs performed during the Artists Music Guild's 2012 AMG Heritage Awards on November 10, 2012 and upon the completion of her performance she was presented with a Lifetime Achievement Award for her years of dedication to her craft without having any prior knowledge that she would be receiving such honors.[12]

Discography[edit]

Albums[edit]

Year Title Chart Positions Label
US Country US
1981 Somebody's Knockin' 6 53 MCA
I'm a Lady 40
1982 Some Days It Rains All Night Long 33
1983 Over Easy 32
1985 The Best of Terri Gibbs
Old Friends 58 Warner Bros.
1987 Turn Around Canaan
1988 Comfort the People
1990 What a Great Day Morning Gate

Singles[edit]

Year Title Chart Positions Album
US Country[7] US[7] US AC CAN Country CAN CAN AC
1980 "Somebody's Knockin'" 8 13 3 2 20 14 Somebody's Knockin'
1981 "Rich Man" 19 89 37 29
"I Wanna Be Around" 38 I'm a Lady
"Mis'ry River" 12 7
1982 "Ashes to Ashes" 19 19 Some Days It Rains All Night Long
"Some Days It Rains All Night Long" 45
1983 "Baby I'm Gone" 33 29
"Anybody Else's Heart but Mine" 17 17 Over Easy
"Tell Mama" 65 28
1985 "A Few Good Men" 43 41 Old Friends
"Rockin' in a Brand New Cradle" 70 53
"Someone Must Be Missing You Tonight" 70
1987 "Turn Around" 87 Turn Around

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Huey, Steve. "Terri Gibbs biography". Allmusic. Retrieved 2009-08-09. 
  2. ^ a b c d Miller, Zell (1996). They Heard Georgia Singing. Mercer University Press. pp. 117–118. ISBN 0-86554-504-9. Retrieved 2009-08-09. 
  3. ^ Don Rhodes. "Groveton Singer Determined to Win a Place in Music." Augusta (GA) Chronicle, December 15, 1974, p. F5.
  4. ^ Nancy Bishop. "Terri Gibbs: At Last Fame is Knockin' at her Door." Dallas Morning News, November 23, 1981, p. C8.
  5. ^ a b c "Chart history for Terri Gibbs". Allmusic. Retrieved 2009-08-09. 
  6. ^ "CMA archives". CMT. Retrieved 2009-08-09. 
  7. ^ a b c d e Whitburn, Joel (2008). Hot Country Songs 1944 to 2008. Record Research, Inc. p. 157. ISBN 0-89820-177-2. 
  8. ^ a b c d e Kingsbury, Paul (2004). The Encyclopedia of Country Music. Sourcebooks, Inc. pp. 198–199. ISBN 0-19-517608-1. Retrieved 2009-08-09. 
  9. ^ Hurst, Jack (1985-04-14). "Terri Gibbs - Old Friends". The Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 2009-08-09. 
  10. ^ a b "Biography". Terri Gibbs. Retrieved 2009-08-09. 
  11. ^ Gibbs, Terri. "Awards". CMT. Retrieved 23 November 2012. 
  12. ^ Gibbs, Terri. "Gibbs given a Lifetime Achievement Award". Artists Music Guild. Retrieved 23 November 2012. 

External links[edit]