Terry Gibson

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Terry Gibson
Personal information
Full name Terence Bradley Gibson
Date of birth (1962-12-23) 23 December 1962 (age 52)
Place of birth Walthamstow, London, England
Height 5 ft 4 in (1.63 m)
Playing position Forward
Youth career
1979–1980 Tottenham Hotspur
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1980–1983 Tottenham Hotspur 18 (4)
1981 GAIS (loan) 13 (5)
1983–1986 Coventry City 98 (43)
1986–1987 Manchester United 23 (1)
1987–1993 Wimbledon 86 (22)
1992 Swindon Town (loan) 9 (1)
1993 Peterborough United 1 (0)
1994–1995 Barnet 32 (5)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).

Terence Bradley "Terry" Gibson (born 23 December 1962 in Walthamstow) is an English former footballer who played as a forward for several clubs, including Tottenham Hotspur, Coventry City, Manchester United and Wimbledon.

Playing career[edit]

Gibson was educated at Highams Park School in Highams Park, London. He started his career at Tottenham Hotspur, making his first team debut at the age of 17 years and 6 days, before moving to Coventry City in 1983. In 1981, he was loaned out to the Swedish team GAIS, who in that time played in the Swedish second division.

At Coventry, his impressive tally of 52 goals in just over 100 appearances (including a hat-trick in Coventry's famous 4-0 league win over Liverpool at Highfield Road in December 1983)[1] earned him a high-profile transfer to Manchester United in January 1986. His arrival came when Mark Hughes was in the process of agreeing a transfer to FC Barcelona of Spain for the end of the season, and manager Ron Atkinson was looking to buy a new striker. However, with Hughes not leaving until the close season and his strike partner Frank Stapleton staying put, Gibson spent most of his time on the bench and his chances of first team action barely improved even when Hughes left as Atkinson had since signed striker Peter Davenport. The Reds had been top of the league when Gibson had joined them but a disappointing second half of the season sucked them down to fourth place, and Atkinson was sacked in early November following a terrible start to the 1986-87 season. His successor Alex Ferguson did not appear to want to keep Gibson at United, and with the arrival of Brian McClair in the 1987 close season Gibson was on his way out of Old Trafford after just 18 months.

He later was a part of the Wimbledon team that won the 1988 FA Cup Final against Liverpool.[2] Other clubs include Swindon Town, Peterborough United and Barnet as player coach alongside Ray Clemence, while he also had brief stints as a trialist with Charlton Athletic and as a non-contract player with Tottenham, but did not play in either club's first team during those spells.

Post-playing career[edit]

He had spells as youth team coach and caretaker manager at Barnet after retiring from playing in 1995. He was also coach of the Northern Ireland national team, assisting his former Wimbledon team-mate Lawrie Sanchez to victories over England, Spain and Sweden amongst others. Prior to this he was assistant manager at Wycombe Wanderers, also working alongside Sanchez where together they guided the third tier team to the FA Cup semi-finals in 2001 where they were narrowly defeated 2-1 by Liverpool. He was also appointed as coach of Premier League club Fulham in April 2007 assisting in the survival of the club in the Premier League. Gibson left the club after the departure of Sanchez in December 2007.[3]

He is now working as a co-commentator on Sky Sports' coverage of Spanish football. Gibson gained extensive experience of Spanish football whilst working as a Scout for Premier League clubs Bolton Wanderers and Manchester City.[4] He combined this role with coaching Northern Ireland and was based in Southern Spain.

Personal life[edit]

He is married to Paula and they have two children Chloe and Joshua. Gibson is a cousin by marriage to Man Utd goalkeeping legend Les Sealey.[4] He is a self-confessed Tottenham Hotspur fan, having played for them in the early part of his career.[5]

Honours[edit]

Wimbledon

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Gibbo returns". Coventry City F.C. 10 January 2008. Retrieved 28 January 2010. 
  2. ^ Dyer, Ken. "Gibson won't forget those crazy days". Evening Standard. Retrieved 28 January 2010. 
  3. ^ "Coaches Depart". Fulham Official Website. 21 December 2007. Retrieved 16 April 2014. 
  4. ^ a b Speck, Ivan (26 May 2009). "Why one striker will watch United's date with destiny from a hospital bed". Daily Mail. Retrieved 28 January 2010. 
  5. ^ "Modric a must have?", Sky Sports, 28 August 2012. Retrieved on 29 August 2012.

External links[edit]