Terry Mulholland

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Terry Mulholland
2012 12 08 009 Terry Mulholland.jpg
Terry Mullholland in Valley Forge, Pennsylvania on December 8, 2012
Pitcher
Born: (1963-03-09) March 9, 1963 (age 51)
Uniontown, Pennsylvania
Batted: Right Threw: Left
MLB debut
June 8, 1986 for the San Francisco Giants
Last MLB appearance
June 3, 2006 for the Arizona Diamondbacks
Career statistics
Win–loss record 124–142
Earned run average 4.41
Strikeouts 1,325
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Terence John Mulholland (born March 9, 1963 in Uniontown, Pennsylvania) is a retired Major League Baseball pitcher. He threw left-handed and batted right-handed.

Early and personal life[edit]

Mulholland is a 1981 graduate of Laurel Highlands (Pennsylvania) High School. He maintains a strong connection to his high school, where his baseball uniform number has been retired. He attended Marietta College in (Ohio) where he majored in sports medicine and played for legendary NCAA Division III coach Don Schaly.

He was a first team All-American his junior season when he was drafted in the first round by the San Francisco Giants. The school's baseball field sits on Mulholland Drive; it was renamed so in 1994 after Mulholland purchased a new lighting system for the field.

Terry is part owner of the Dirty Dogg Saloon, a bar in Scottsdale, Arizona. He has one child with his ex-wife. He remarried on February 14, 2009.

Career[edit]

Mulholland made his Major League debut on June 8, 1986, with the San Francisco Giants. After that, he played for eleven different Major League teams: the Giants, the Phillies, the Yankees, the Mariners, the Cubs, the Braves, the Dodgers, the Pirates, the Indians, the Twins, and the Diamondbacks.

He is well known for having one of the "nastiest" pickoff moves in the game.[1]

San Francisco Giants[edit]

While pitching for the Giants, Mulholland made a play that is often shown on sports bloopers shows. After he grabbed a hard-hit ground ball, the ball got stuck in the webbing of his glove. Mulholland then ran towards first base and tossed his glove to first baseman Bob Brenly, who recorded the out.

Philadelphia Phillies[edit]

He pitched a no-hitter for the Phillies against the Giants on August 15, 1990; it was the first no-hitter in Veterans Stadium history. He faced the minimum of 27 batters. The only batter to reach base, on an error by Charlie Hayes, was retired in a double play. The 27th out was made by Hayes with a lunging catch of Gary Carter's line drive down the 3rd base line. He defeated Don Robinson, who also served up the 500th career home run to Phillies legend, Mike Schmidt, just three years earlier.[2]

Mulholland started Game 6 for the Phillies in the 1993 World Series versus the Toronto Blue Jays. This game will always be remembered for Mitch Williams giving up the series-ending home run to Joe Carter. Mulholland was also the starting pitcher for the National League in the 1993 All-Star Game played at Camden Yards in Baltimore, Maryland.

Chicago Cubs[edit]

Terry was instrumental in the Cubs' 1998 playoff run, pitching in relief and as a starter, often on consecutive days.

Atlanta Braves[edit]

At the 1999 trading deadline, the Braves acquired Mulholland along with infielder José Hernández from the Chicago Cubs for Micah Bowie, Rubén Quevedo and a player to be named later. He appeared in 16 games down the stretch with the Braves, going 4-2 with an ERA of 2.98, during a season that the Braves went to the World Series. The next season, Mulholland was used as a spot starter for the Braves, and went 9-9 with a 5.11 ERA in 156.7 innings of work. He became a free agent after the season ended.

Minnesota Twins[edit]

While pitching for the Minnesota Twins Mulholland became one of the few players who have beaten every Major League team.

Arizona Diamondbacks[edit]

On June 21, 2006, the Diamondbacks waived Mulholland.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ ESPN - The definite pick - MLB
  2. ^ "Phillies' Mulholland Pitches Season's 8th No-Hitter". New York Times. 16 August 1990. Retrieved 23 January 2013. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Fernando Valenzuela
No-hitter pitcher
August 15, 1990
Succeeded by
Dave Stieb