Terry Zahn

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search


Terry Allen Zahn (April 27, 1946 – January 25, 2000) was a television reporter and anchorman in Hampton Roads, Virginia, from 1981 until his death in 2000 from multiple myeloma (a type of bone cancer).

Biography[edit]

Born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Zahn received a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee in 1968, with a double major in radio-television and sociology. In 1974, he was awarded a Master of Arts degree in communications from the University of Hawaii in Honolulu. [1]

In 1969, Zahn was commissioned as an ensign in the U.S. Navy in 1969 and served as an officer in Norfolk to the Commander Carrier Division 2. He made two deployments to the Mediterranean Sea aboard the USS John F. Kennedy.

Zahn moved to WAVY-TV in Portsmouth, Virginia, in 1981 as weekend anchor and reporter; in 1984, he became the 6 p.m. and 11 p.m. co-anchor. In 1994, he moved to WVEC-TV as 5 p.m. and 11 p.m. co-anchor; in 1996, he became the 6 p.m. and 11 p.m. co-anchor. He won numerous reporting awards from the Associated Press, United Press International, and the Virginia Association of Broadcasters. In 1984, with another reporter, he won the Radio TV News Directors Association International Award (best in the nation) for coverage of the sinking of the coal ship Marine Electric. At WVEC, Zahn produced several documentary programs, including "These Hallowed Sands," produced on the 50th anniversary of D-Day, and "When the War Came to America," recounting U-Boat attacks on U.S. shipping off the coast of Virginia and North Carolina in the early stages of World War II.

Zahn also taught college-level courses adjunct at four colleges and universities, including Old Dominion University. He was active in numerous charities, especially the American Cancer Society.

Cancer[edit]

Zahn was first diagnosed with cancer in the late 1990s. Prior to his diagnosis, he had been active in planning the Hampton Roads area Relay for Life and a supporter of the American Cancer Society. He served on the Chesapeake, Portsmouth and Virginia Beach Board of Directors and was a member of the National Advisory Committee for the Cancer Society’s main fund-raiser, the Relay for Life. Zahn produced a series of television news stories and a documentary program about his battle with cancer. The program, which aired on WVEC-TV, was entitled "My Race Against Cancer." [2]The program chronicled his medical progress and personal ordeal from the time of his diagnosis until his cancer went into remission. At WVEC, Zahn produced two nationally-distributed videos for the American Cancer Society encouraging communities to hold Relay for Life events. Zahn toured the United States to promote Relay for Life and continued his involvement with Relay until his death.

At the time of his death, Zahn lived in Chesapeake, Virginia, where he is buried. He was survived by his wife, Jean Zahn.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Terry Zahn
  2. ^ 'Relay' captains ready for the walk, Virginia/North Carolina News