Terukuni Manzō

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Terukuni Manzō
照國 万藏
Terukuni.jpg
Personal information
Born Marizo Suga
(1919-01-10)January 10, 1919
Akita, Japan
Died March 20, 1977(1977-03-20) (aged 58)
Height 1.74 m (5 ft 8 12 in)
Weight 161 kg (355 lb)
Career
Stable Isegahama
Record 313-110-74
Debut January 1935
Highest rank Yokozuna (May 1942)
Retired January, 1953
Championships 2 (Makuuchi)
1 (Jūryō)
1 (Makushita)
Gold Stars 1 (Minanogawa)
* Up to date as of October 2007.

Terukuni Manzō (照國 万藏, January 10, 1919 – March 20, 1977) was a sumo wrestler from Ogachi, Akita Prefecture, Japan. He was the sport's 38th yokozuna. He was promoted to yokozuna without any top division tournament titles to his name, although he later attained two.[1]

Career[edit]

In the summer of 1930, he was scouted by Isegahama, former sekiwake Kiyosegawa Keinosuke, his distant relative. However, he was largely forgotten due to the disruption caused by the Shunjuen Incident of 1932, in which a large number of wrestlers went on strike. After the dispute was settled, he joined Isegahama stable in 1934, making his debut in January 1935.

He was promoted to the top makuuchi division in May 1939, and reached the ōzeki rank in May 1941. After two tournaments at ōzeki, he finished in a three way tie for the championship in May 1942 with Futabayama and Akinoumi, on 13-2. The championship was awarded to Futabayama (whom Terukuni had defeated in their individual match) simply because he was of a higher rank, as was the rule at the time. Nevertheless, after the tournament both Terukuni and Akinoumi were promoted to yokozuna. At 23 years of age, Terukuni was the youngest wrestler to reach the yokozuna rank until the promotion of Taihō in 1961. He did extremely well in his yokozuna debut, scoring 14-1, although he finished one win behind Futabayama, who won his last match by default.

He was a heavy wrestler for his time, weighing over 160 kg (350 lb). During World War II, his weight declined due to the food shortages.

Having been a runner-up on five previous occasions, he finally won his first championship in September 1950, about eight years after his promotion. He won his second championship in the very next tournament with a perfect 15-0 record.

Three days into the January 1953 tournament, he announced his retirement. After the tournament, Kagamisato was promoted to yokozuna, and a photograph was taken of Terukuni and Kagamisato alongside the other grand champions Chiyonoyama, Azumafuji and Haguroyama. As Terukuni had not yet had his official retirement ceremony, some regard January 1953 as being the only occasion on which there were five yokozuna at the same time.[1]

Retirement from sumo[edit]

After his retirement, he became head coach of Isegahama stable and produced ōzeki Kiyokuni Katsuo. He had already made arrangements to pass control over the stable over to Kiyokuni at the time of his death in 1977 at the age of 58.

Career record[edit]

  • Through most of the 1940s only two tournaments were held a year, and in 1946 only one was held. The New Year tournament began and the Spring tournament moved to Osaka in 1953.
Terukuni Manzō[2]
- Spring
Haru basho, Tokyo
Summer
Natsu basho, Tokyo
Autumn
Aki basho, Tokyo
1935 (Maezumo) Shinjo
1–3
 
Not held
1936 West Jonokuchi #4
3–3
 
East Jonidan #17
5–1
 
Not held
1937 West Sandanme #22
5–1
 
West Makushita #21
11–2
Champion

 
Not held
1938 East Jūryō #13
6–7
 
West Makushita #1
5–2
 
Not held
1939 East Jūryō #8
11–2
Champion

 
West Maegashira #15
11–4
 
Not held
1940 East Maegashira #2
12–3
East Sekiwake #2
11–4
 
Not held
1941 West Sekiwake #1
12–3
 
West Sekiwake #1
13–2
 
Not held
1942 East Ōzeki #1
12–3
 
West Ōzeki #2
13–2
 
Not held
1943 East Yokozuna #2
14–1
 
West Yokozuna #1
12–3
 
Not held
1944 East Yokozuna #1
11–4
 
West Yokozuna #1
6–4
 
West Yokozuna #1
4–2–4
 
1945 Not held East Yokozuna #1
5–2
 
East Yokozuna #2
9–1
 
1946 Not held Not held East Yokozuna #1
3–3–7
 
1947 Not held West Yokozuna #1
7–3
 
West Yokozuna #1
7–4
 
1948 Not held West Yokozuna #1
9–2
 
East Yokozuna #1
2–5–4
 
1949 Sat out due to injury East Yokozuna #2
12–3
 
East Yokozuna #1
8–2–5
 
1950 East Yokozuna #2
2–2–11
 
East Yokozuna #2
11–4
 
East Yokozuna #2
13–2
 
1951 East Yokozuna #1
15–0
 
East Yokozuna #1
10–5
 
West Yokozuna #1
11–4
 
1952 West Yokozuna #1
10–5
 
East Yokozuna #2
Sat out due to injury
0–0–15
West Yokozuna #2
6–6–3
 
- New Year
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
Spring
Haru basho, Osaka
Summer
Natsu basho, Tokyo
Autumn
Aki basho, Tokyo
1953 East Yokozuna #2
Retired
0–3–12
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi(s); P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: YokozunaŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Sharnoff, Lora (1993). Grand Sumo. Weatherhill. ISBN 0-8348-0283-x. 
  2. ^ "Terukuni Manzo Rikishi Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 2007-10-14. 

External links[edit]

Previous:
Akinoumi Setsuo
38th Yokozuna
1942 - 1953
Next:
Maedayama Eigorō
Yokozuna is not a successive rank, and more than one wrestler can share the title