Teterboro, New Jersey

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Teterboro, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Teterboro
Teterboro Airport's control tower in 2012.
Teterboro Airport's control tower in 2012.
Map highlighting Teterboro's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey.
Map highlighting Teterboro's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Teterboro, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Teterboro, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°51′11″N 74°03′37″W / 40.852999°N 74.060355°W / 40.852999; -74.060355Coordinates: 40°51′11″N 74°03′37″W / 40.852999°N 74.060355°W / 40.852999; -74.060355[1][2]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Bergen
Incorporated March 26, 1917
Government[6]
 • Type 1923 Municipal Manager Law
 • Mayor John P. Watt (term ends June 30, 2014)[3]
 • Administrator Nicholas C. Saros[4][5]
 • Clerk Virginia A. Alcuri[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 1.158 sq mi (3.000 km2)
 • Land 1.157 sq mi (2.907 km2)
 • Water 0.001 sq mi (0.003 km2)
Area rank 490th of 566 in state
62nd of 70 in county[2]
Elevation[7] 7 ft (2 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10][11]
 • Total 67
 • Estimate (2012[12]) 70
 • Rank 563rd of 566 in state
70th of 70 in county[13]
 • Density 57.9/sq mi (22.4/km2)
 • Density rank 553rd of 566 in state
70th of 70 in county[13]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07608[14][15]
Area code(s) 201[16]
FIPS code 3400372480[17][2][18]
GNIS feature ID 0885418[19][2]
Website Web site

Teterboro (pronounced TEE-ter-bo-ro[citation needed]) is a borough in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 67,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 49 (+272.2%) from the 18 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 4 (-18.2%) from the 22 counted in the 1990 Census.[20] As of 2010, it the fourth-smallest municipality, by population, in New Jersey.[21]

Teterboro is the home of Teterboro Airport (operated by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey) which takes up most of the borough, along with portions of Hasbrouck Heights and Moonachie.[22]

Geography[edit]

Teterboro is located at 40°51′11″N 74°03′37″W / 40.852999°N 74.060355°W / 40.852999; -74.060355 (40.852999,-74.060355). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 1.158 square miles (3.000 km2), of which, 1.157 square miles (2.997 km2) of it was land and 0.001 square miles (0.003 km2) of it (0.08%) was water.[1][2]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 7
1910 20 185.7%
1920 24 20.0%
1930 26 8.3%
1940 40 53.8%
1950 28 −30.0%
1960 22 −21.4%
1970 19 −13.6%
1980 19 0.0%
1990 22 15.8%
2000 18 −18.2%
2010 67 272.2%
Est. 2012 70 [12] 4.5%
Population sources: 1920[23]
1920-1930[24] 1900-2010[25][26][27]
2000[28][29] 2010[8][9][10]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 67 people, 25 households, and 13 families residing in the borough. The population density was 57.9 per square mile (22.4 /km2). There were 27 housing units at an average density of 23.3 per square mile (9.0 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 67.16% (45) White, 4.48% (3) Black or African American, 2.99% (2) Native American, 2.99% (2) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 8.96% (6) from other races, and 13.43% (9) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 35.82% (24) of the population.[8]

There were 25 households, of which 28.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 36.0% were married couples living together, 12.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 48.0% were non-families. 32.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 20.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.68 and the average family size was 3.85.[8]

In the borough, 23.9% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.0% from 18 to 24, 23.9% from 25 to 44, 32.8% from 45 to 64, and 13.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.5 years. For every 100 females there were 86.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.2 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $78,571 (with a margin of error of +/- $31,104) and the median family income was $79,107 (+/- $46,857). Males had a median income of $72,031 (+/- $9,149) versus $24,286 (+/- $75,310) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $32,446 (+/- $14,230). About 0.0% of families and 13.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.0% of those under age 18 and 100.0% of those age 65 or over.[30]

Same-sex couples headed no households in either 2010 or 2000.[31]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 18 people, 7 households, and 4 families residing in the borough. The population density was 16.2 people per square mile (6.3/km2). There were 8 housing units at an average density of 7.2 per square mile (2.8/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 83.33% White, and 16.67% from two or more races.[28][29]

There were 7 households out of which 42.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.9% were married couples living together, 28.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.6% were non-families. 14.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.57 and the average family size was 3.00.[28][29]

In the borough the population was spread out with 33.3% under the age of 18, 5.6% from 18 to 24, 50.0% from 25 to 44, 5.6% from 45 to 64, and 5.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females there were 100.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.0 males.[28][29]

The median income for a household in the borough was $44,167, and the median income for a family was $43,750. Males had a median income of $18,750 versus $38,750 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $72,613. None of the population or families were below the poverty line.[28][29]

Borough officials stated that the 2000 Census had failed to count any of the residents of the Vincent Place housing units who had moved into the newly built homes in 1999.[32] The uncounted residents, including the Mayor and all four Council members, would help make up a projected tripling of the population enumerated by the census.[33] Previously, the Mayor and Council, as well as several other Vincent Place residents, had all been residents of Huyler Street, the only other street zoned as a residential area in the borough. In a March 2010 article, published in The Record, Teterboro's municipal manager at the time noted that the actual population of the town had grown to approximately 60.[34]

History[edit]

Teterboro was incorporated on March 26, 1917, from land taken from the boroughs of Moonachie and Little Ferry and from Lodi Township. The borough was enlarged on July 5, 1918, by the addition of an area annexed from Hasbrouck Heights. The name Teterboro was changed on April 14, 1937, to Bendix Borough, but changed back to Teterboro Borough on June 1, 1943.[35] The borough was named for Walter C. Teter, a New York investment banker, who had purchased land to build a racetrack and developed a 700-acre (280 ha) site, reclaiming marshland and building an airport and an 18-hole golf course.[36]

In the past, neighboring municipalities, such as Hasbrouck Heights and South Hackensack, have attempted to dissolve Teterboro, in hopes of absorbing the town's ratables. Some people have reasoned that the population is too small for the borough to justify its own existence. However, all such attempts have met with failure, due to resistance from residents, business owners and municipal officials. In July 2010, a bill was introduced in the New Jersey state senate in a renewed effort to divide Teterboro among neighboring towns.[37] The bill stalled in the state Legislature after its introduction, due to opposition from the borough as well as the neighboring municipalities of Moonachie and Hasbrouck Heights.[38] The legality of a 20-year tax abatement proposed for Teterboro businesses within the bill, which had been included to alleviate concerns of property owners that taxes could spike if the borough was dissolved, was also called into question.[39]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Teterboro is governed under the 1923 Municipal Manager Law form of New Jersey municipal government. The government consists of a Borough Council comprising five council members, with all positions elected at large in partisan elections to four-year terms on a concurrent basis.[6] The Council nominates and votes on one of its members to serve as mayor.

As of 2013, Teterboro's Borough Council consists of Mayor John P. Watt, James O'Dwyer, Juan Ramirez, Gregory Stein and John B. Watt, all serving concurrent terms of office ending December 31, 2014.[4][40]

Law enforcement services are provided under contract by the Moonachie Police Department and the Bergen County Police Department.[41]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Teterboro is located in the 9th Congressional District[42] and is part of New Jersey's 36th state legislative district.[9][43][44] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Teterboro had been in the 38th state legislative district.[45]

New Jersey's Ninth Congressional District is represented by Bill Pascrell (D, Paterson).[46] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[47][48] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[49][50]

The 36th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Paul Sarlo (D, Wood-Ridge) and in the General Assembly by Marlene Caride (D, Ridgefield) and Gary Schaer (D, Passaic).[51] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[52] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[53]

Bergen County is governed by a directly elected County Executive, with legislative functions performed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders.[54] The County Executive is Kathleen Donovan (R, Rutherford; term ends December 31, 2014).[55] The seven freeholders are elected at-large in partisan elections on a staggered basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year, with a Chairman, Vice Chairman and Chairman Pro Tempore selected from among its members at a reorganization meeting held each January.[56] As of 2014, Bergen County's Freeholders are Freeholder Chairman David L. Ganz (D, 2014; Fair Lawn),[57] Vice Chairwoman Joan Voss (D, 2014; Fort Lee),[58] Chairman Pro Tempore John A. Felice (R, 2016; River Edge),[59] Maura R. DeNicola (R, 2016; Franklin Lakes),[60] Steve Tanelli (D, 2015; North Arlington)[61] James J. Tedesco, III (D, 2015; Paramus)[62] and Tracy Silna Zur (D, 2015; Franklin Lakes).[63][64] Countywide constitutional officials are County Clerk John S. Hogan (D, Northvale),[65] Sheriff Michael Saudino (R),[66] Surrogate Michael R. Dressler (D, Cresskill)[67][68][54]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 39 registered voters in Teterboro, of which 12 (30.8% vs. 31.7% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 10 (25.6% vs. 21.1%) were registered as Republicans and 17 (43.6% vs. 47.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were no voters registered to other parties.[69] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 58.2% (vs. 57.1% in Bergen County) were registered to vote, including 76.5% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 73.7% countywide).[69][70]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 14 votes here (58.3% vs. 54.8% countywide), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 9 votes (37.5% vs. 43.5%) and other candidates with one vote (4.2% vs. 0.9%), among the 24 ballots cast by the borough's 43 registered voters, for a turnout of 55.8% (vs. 70.4% in Bergen County).[71][72] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 13 votes here (52.0% vs. 44.5% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 12 votes (48.0% vs. 53.9%), among the 25 ballots cast by the borough's 34 registered voters, for a turnout of 73.5% (vs. 76.8% in Bergen County).[73][74] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 14 votes here (56.0% vs. 51.7% countywide), ahead of Republican George W. Bush with 8 votes (32.0% vs. 47.2%) and other candidates with 2 votes (8.0% vs. 0.7%), among the 25 ballots cast by the borough's 36 registered voters, for a turnout of 69.4% (vs. 76.9% in the whole county).[75]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 10 votes here (50.0% vs. 45.8% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 6 votes (30.0% vs. 48.0%) and Independent Chris Daggett with 3 votes (15.0% vs. 4.7%), among the 20 ballots cast by the borough's 35 registered voters, yielding a 57.1% turnout (vs. 50.0% in the county).[76]

Education[edit]

The Hasbrouck Heights School District serves students from Hasbrouck Heights as well as those from Teterboro, a non-operating district that was merged into the Hasbrouck Heights School District following its dissolution on July 1, 2010.[77]

Prior to July 2010, public school students in Kindergarten through eighth grade attended Memorial School in South Hackensack, as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the South Hackensack School District.[78] High school students had an option to attend Hackensack High School of the Hackensack Public Schools, the receiving district for South Hackensack students, or Hasbrouck Heights High School. Teterboro students already enrolled in South Hackensack or Hackensack schools, prior to July 2010, were given the option to remain in those schools.

Public school students from the borough, and all of Bergen County, are eligible to attend the secondary education programs offered by the Bergen County Technical Schools, which include the Bergen County Academies in Hackensack, and the Bergen Tech campus in Teterboro or Paramus. The district offers programs on a shared-time or full-time basis, with admission based on a selective application process and tuition covered by the student's home school district.[79][80]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

The borough had a total of 4.65 miles (7.48 km) of roadways, of which 3.28 miles (5.28 km) are maintained by the municipality, 0.30 miles (0.48 km) by Bergen County and 1.07 miles (1.72 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[81]

U.S. Route 46 travels east-west through Teterboro to the north of Teterboro Airport,[82] while a small piece of Interstate 80 travels along the northern edge of the borough.[83] Route 17 travels parallel to the Hasbrouck Heights - Teterboro border on the Hasbrouck Heights side.[84]

Public transportation[edit]

Teterboro is served by New Jersey Transit at the Teterboro train station, located on Williams Avenue near Route 17.[85] The station offers service on the Pascack Valley Line, which runs north-south to Hoboken Terminal with connections via the Secaucus Junction transfer station to New Jersey Transit one-stop service to New York Penn Station and to other NJ Transit rail service, and at Hoboken Terminal to other New Jersey Transit rail lines, the PATH train at the Hoboken PATH station, New York Waterways ferry service to the World Financial Center and other destinations and Hudson-Bergen Light Rail service.[86]

New Jersey Transit provides bus service on the 161 (on Route 46), 164 and 165 routes to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan, to Newark on the 76 route, with local service on the 772 route.[87]

References[edit]

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  5. ^ Gavin, John A. "Teterboro manager plans retirement after 12 years on job", The Record (Bergen County), February 22, 2011. Accessed March 3, 2011.
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  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Teterboro, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
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  22. ^ Directions to and from the Airport, Port Authority of New York & New Jersey. Accessed July 7, 2008. "Teterboro Airport is located in the Boroughs of Teterboro, Moonachie, and Hasbrouck Heights in Bergen County, New Jersey."
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  26. ^ Bergen County Data Book 2003, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 21, 2013. Population for the decades prior to formation of borough in 1917 have been extrapolated by county statisticians.
  27. ^ Historical Population Trends in Bergen County, Bergen County Department of Planning & Economic Development, 2011. Accessed November 6, 2013. Data for years prior to the borough's establishment were extrapolated by county analysts.
  28. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Teterboro borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 3, 2013.
  29. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Teterboro borough, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 3, 2013.
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  31. ^ Lipman, Harvy; and Sheingold, Dave. "North Jersey sees 30% growth in same-sex couples", The Record (Bergen County), August 14, 2011. Accessed March 19, 2013.
  32. ^ Kim, Yung. "Census math puzzles Teterboro", copy of article from The Record (Bergen County), March 22, 2001. Accessed July 31, 2013. "If you believe the recent census count, all of 18 people call Teterboro home, making it the state's smallest municipality. There's just one problem: Forty-five folks live there."
  33. ^ Chen, David W. "At Three Times the Population, This Town Will Still Be Tiny", The New York Times, March 17, 1996. Accessed February 8, 2012. "In most towns, a dozen or so new apartments would be little more than a footnote to community history. But in this borough, a proposal to build 12 to 16 apartments on a 2.5-acre site represents a seismic change in the landscape, with the potential of tripling its population."
  34. ^ Ervolino, Bill. "Where the grass is greener … if you can find it", The Record (Bergen County), February 27, 2010. Accessed February 8, 2012. "Outside of the Vincent Place apartments, and a few more on nearby Huyler Street, there is no place to live in The Best Place to Live which, according to municipal manager Paul Busch, has a mere 60 residents."
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  37. ^ Gartland, Michael; and Sheingold, Dave. "S. Hackensack, Little Ferry up for windfalls if Teterboro is divided", The Record (Bergen County), July 15, 2010. Accessed December 19, 2013. "South Hackensack and Little Ferry would benefit most from a proposal to divide and distribute Teterboro among four neighboring towns and redraw the boundaries of South Hackensack, according to an analysis by The Record."
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  40. ^ Staff. "Five council incumbents win reelection in Teterboro", The Record (Bergen County), May 11, 2010. Accessed February 8, 2012. "John P. Watt, James O’Dwyer, Juan Ramirez, Gregory Stein, and John B. Watt will serve four-year terms, receiving 17, 17, 17, 18 and 17 votes, respectively."
  41. ^ Staff. "Teterboro approves Bergen police patrols in addition to Moonachie", Cliffview Pilot, December 28, 2011. Accessed February 17, 2013. "Moonachie police will continue their contracted coverage of the borough’s east side, under a three-year contract that includes the purchase of a new patrol car, while Bergen County Police get the north end for 2012 in a separate deal approved by Teterboro officials this afternoon, various sources confirmed this afternoon."
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  78. ^ Staff. "GUIDE TO SCHOOL ELECTIONS -- TETERBORO", The Record (Bergen County), April 4, 2001. Accessed September 4, 2008. "Teterboro sends its students to South Hackensack schools and has a three-member board that prepares its annual school budget."
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  85. ^ Teterboro station, New Jersey Transit. Accessed November 6, 2013.
  86. ^ Pascack Valley Line, New Jersey Transit. Accessed November 6, 2013.
  87. ^ Bergen County Bus / Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of January 11, 2010. Accessed February 8, 2012.

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