Texan brig Archer

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Texan brig.JPG
Brig Archer
Career (Republic of Texas) Texas Naval Ensign.svg
Namesake: Branch Tanner Archer
Builder: Schott and Whitney, Baltimore
Launched: April 25, 1840
Commissioned: 1842
Decommissioned: May 11, 1846
Renamed: Originally called the Galveston
Homeport: Galveston, Texas
Fate: transferred to the United States Navy and then sold
General characteristics
Class & type: Brig
Displacement: 405 tons
Tons burthen: 419 tons
Length: 112 ft (34 m)
Beam: 29 ft (8.8 m)
Draft: 11 ft (3.4 m)
Propulsion: wind
Speed: variable
Complement: 17 officers
123 sailors & marines
Armament: 15-18 lb. med.
1-9 lb. long

The Texan brig Archer was a two-masted brig of the Second Texas Navy from 1842-1846. She was the sister ship of the Wharton. Transferred to the United States Navy in 1846, she was sold for $450.

History of the Archer[edit]

Archer was built in Baltimore, Maryland at the Schott and Whitney shipyard. Originally called the Galveston, she was rechristened in honor of Branch Tanner Archer, a diplomat of the Republic of Texas. [1]

She was the last ship of the Texas Navy to be delivered under a contract with the shipbuilding firm Schott and Whitney. She was constructed in Baltimore and was delivered on April 25, 1840. In response to the raids of Mexican generals Rafael Vásquez and Adrián Woll, she was commissioned in 1842. In April of that year she was sent to New Orleans, Louisiana for refitting and re-arming, most of her guns having been transferred to the Austin and the Wharton. The Archer was never sent to sea on a major cruise.

Transfer to the U.S. Navy[edit]

When the United States formally annexed Texas on May 11, 1846, the Archer was transferred to the United States Navy, which in turn sold the ship for 450 dollars on November 30, 1846.

Commanders of the Vessel[edit]

The Archer was commanded by:

  • Capt. John Clark, 1840 - 1841[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Cutrer, Thomas. "Wharton". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 2007-11-24.