Texas A&M College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

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College of Agriculture and Life Sciences
Parent institution Texas A&M University
Dean Mark Hussey
Academic staff 300
Students 6691 (2008)
Undergraduates 5425
Website aglifesciences.tamu.edu

Texas A&M College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, or AgLifeSciences for short, is one of ten colleges and schools that are part of Texas A&M University. Agriculture and the Life Sciences have been part of the university since its founding in 1876 as the "Agricultural & Mechanical College of Texas." The College was formally recognized in 1911. A part of the land grant university system, the college offers more than 80 undergrad and grad degree programs across 14 departments. It is also one of the five organizations that comprise Texas A&M AgriLife.

Dr. Mark Hussey is dean and Dr. Alan Sams is the executive associate dean.[1] Other senior administrators include Dr. Ann Kenimer, associate dean for academic operations, Dr. David Reed, associate dean for graduate programs and faculty development, and Dr. Chris Skaggs, associate dean for undergraduate programs.[2]

Academics and enrollment[edit]

The college employs nearly 400 faculty members across 14 departments, with over 300 of those being full-time faculty.[3][4] Those departments include: Agricultural Economics; Agricultural Leadership, Education & Communications; Animal Science; Biochemistry/Biophysics; Biological and Agricultural Engineering; Ecosystem Science and Management; Entomology; Horticultural Sciences; Nutrition and Food Sciences; Plant Pathology and Microbiology; Poultry Science; Recreation, Park and Tourism Sciences; Soil and Crop Sciences; and Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences.[4] 31 degrees are available to undergraduate students, with all degrees being Bachelor of Science degrees, except within the horticulture department, which also offers a Bachelor of Arts degree.[5] It offers 45 master's-level degree programs and 27 doctoral-level programs (including 9 interdisciplinary degrees).[6]

In 2008, 6691 students were enrolled in the college, with 5425 of those being undergraduate enrollments.[3][7] According to the 2008 FAEIS survey released by the USDA, A&M has the largest enrollment among the 234 agricultural colleges and land-grant universities for which USDA receives such data.[7]

Notable faculty[edit]

The college faculty has included several professors who have been awarded national and international honors.[8]

Active faculty[edit]

Former faculty[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Administration". Texas A&M College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Retrieved 2009-08-26. 
  2. ^ "Office of the Dean Directory". Texas A&M College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Retrieved 2009-08-26. 
  3. ^ a b Mayes, Dave (2008-12-08). "Regents name Hussey to top Texas A&M agriculture and life sciences position". Southwest Farm Press (Press release). Texas A&M College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Retrieved 2009-03-05. 
  4. ^ a b "Departments". Texas A&M College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Retrieved 2009-03-05. 
  5. ^ "Undergraduate Majors/Options". Texas A&M College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Retrieved 2009-03-05. 
  6. ^ "Graduate Degree Programs Table". Texas A&M College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Retrieved 2009-03-05. 
  7. ^ a b "FAEIS 2008 Survey Status Report - All Institutions in Faeis". Food and Agricultural Education Information System. USDA. 2009-03-07. Retrieved 2009-03-07. 
  8. ^ "Awards and Accomplishments". Texas A&M College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Retrieved 2009-03-23. [dead link]
  9. ^ "35 People Who Will Shape Our Future: Bruce McCarl". Texas Monthly: 27. February 2008. 
  10. ^ "The Nobel Peace Prize 2007". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-23. 
  11. ^ "Summers, Max D., Texas A&M University-College Station". United States National Academies. Retrieved 2009-03-23. 
  12. ^ "Dr. Edward A. Hiler". United States National Academies. Retrieved 2009-03-23. 
  13. ^ "The 2002/3 Wolf Foundation Prize in Agriculture". Wolf Prize in Agriculture. Retrieved 2009-03-23. 
  14. ^ "Norman Borlaug". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-23. 
  15. ^ "Borlaug, Norman E. Sasakawa Africa Association". United States National Academies. Retrieved 2009-03-23. 

External links[edit]