Texas Legislative Medal of Honor

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Texas Legislative Medal of Honor
Texas Legislative Medal of Honor..svg
Awarded by Texas
Type Military decoration
Eligibility Awarded to members of the Texas Military Forces
Awarded for Gallantry
Status Currently awarded
Description The neck ribbon is green with white stars, and the medal features an image of the reverse of the Seal of Texas, including Vince's Bridge, cannon of the Battle of Gonzales, Alamo Mission in San Antonio and the six historical flags of Texas.
Statistics
First awarded 1997
Last awarded 2013
Total awarded 10
Posthumous
awards
9
Distinct
recipients
10
Precedence
Next (higher) None (highest)
Next (lower) Lone Star Medal of Valor
Texas Legislative Medal of Honor Ribbon.svg
Texas Legislative Medal of Honor service ribbon

The Texas Legislative Medal of Honor is the highest military decoration that may be awarded to a member of the Texas Military Forces. This includes Air National Guard, Army National Guard, and State Guard. This medal may only be awarded to federal military personnel, or state military personnel who serve in the Armed Forces of the State of Texas.

Details[edit]

Description[edit]

The neck ribbon is green with white stars, and the medal features an image of the reverse of the Seal of Texas, including Vince's Bridge, cannon of the Battle of Gonzales, Alamo Mission in San Antonio and the six historical flags of Texas.[citation needed]

This medal takes precedence over the Lone Star Medal of Valor, the state's second highest military decoration.[1]

Institution[edit]

The Texas legislative Medal of Honor was created for those individuals who served in the Texas National Guard and who received the Medal of Honor.[2]

The following is an excerpt from the Texas Government Code, Title 4, Subtitle C, Chapter 431, Subchapter J. Awards, Sec. 431.131:

The Texas Legislative Medal of Honor shall be awarded to a member of the state or federal military forces (effective June 20, 2003) designated by concurrent resolution of the legislature who voluntarily performs a deed of personal bravery or self-sacrifice involving risk of life that is so conspicuous as to clearly distinguish the person for gallantry and intrepidity above the person's comrades. Awarding of the medal shall be considered on the standard of extraordinary merit. The medal may be awarded only on incontestable proof of performance of the deed.[3]

Initially, the law permitted one person to be selected from various nominees for the award by a 5-member nominating committee (effective June 20, 2003) every two years since 1997. The nominating committee consist of the Lieutenant Governor, the Speaker of the House, the Adjutant General of the Texas Military Forces and the heads of the defense and veterans affairs committee in both chambers of the legislature or their designated representative. The person selected must then be approved by the governor to receive the award:

(d) The legislature by concurrent resolution may direct the governor to award the Texas Legislative Medal of Honor to a person nominated by the nominating committee. The committee chairs serving on the nominating committee shall jointly prepare a concurrent resolution directing the governor to award the medal to a person nominated. The legislature may direct the medal to be awarded only during a regular session (effective June 20, 2003) and may not direct the medal to be awarded to more than one person during a regular session.

In 2013, HB 1589 was signed into law by Governor Perry amending the statute for the bestowal of two Texas Legislative Medals of Honor each legislative session, one for service pre-1956 and one for service post-1957.[4]

Recipients[edit]

The Texas Legislative Medal of Honor recipients:

  • 1997: United States Army Technical Sergeant James M. Logan, 36th Infantry Division, WWII, presented posthumously.
  • 1999: United States Army First Lieutenant Jack L. Knight, 124th Cavalry Regiment/Mars Task Force, KIA-WWII, presented posthumously.
  • 2001: United States Army Master Sergeant Roy P. Benavidez, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), Vietnam, presented posthumously.
  • 2003: United States Army Colonel M B Etheredge, 3rd Infantry Division, WWII.
  • 2005: United States Army Captain Robert Thomas Edlin, 2nd Ranger Battalion, WWII, presented posthumously.
  • 2007: United States Marine Corps: Sergeant Alfredo Cantu "Freddy" Gonzalez, 1st Marine Division, KIA-Vietnam, presented posthumously.[5][6]
  • 2009: United States Army Private Pedro Cano, 4th Infantry Division, WWII, presented posthumously.
  • 2011: United States Marine Corps Corporal Roy Cisneros (San Antonio), 3rd Marine Division, KIA-Vietnam, presented posthumously.[7]
  • 2013: United States Army 2nd Lt. Darryn Deen Andrews (Cameron), 501st Parachute Regiment, KIA-Afghanistan, presented posthumously.[8]
  • 2013: United States Army Major Audie Leon Murphy (Farmersville), 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division, WWII, awarded posthumously.[9][10][11][12]

Logan, Benavidez, Knight (KIA), Gonzalez (KIA), and Murphy were also prior recipients of the Medal of Honor (any Texas MOH recipient eligible effective Sept. 9, 1999).
Edlin and Cano were recipients of the Distinguished Service Cross.
Cisnernos (KIA) was recipient of the Navy Cross.
Etheredge was the recipient of 3 Silver Stars and Andrews (KIA) one Silver Star.

Recipients by war:

WWII - 6
Korean War - 0
Vietnam War - 3
Gulf War - 0
Iraq War - 0
Afghanistan War - 1

Notes[edit]

External links[edit]