Texas elections, 2014

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The 2014 general election was held in the U.S. state of Texas on November 4, 2014. All of Texas' executive officers were up for election as well as a United States Senate seat, and all of Texas' thirty-six seats in the United States House of Representatives. Primary elections were held on March 4, 2014. Primary runoffs, required if no candidate wins a majority of the vote, were held on May 27, 2014. Elections were also held for the Texas legislature and proposition 1, seeking funds for Texas highways (which passed).

A combination of retirements, incumbents seeking other offices and a primary defeat means that after the election, for the first time since 1874, all of Texas' executive offices will be held by new officeholders.

Contents

Governor[edit]

Incumbent Republican Governor Rick Perry, who has served in the office since December 21, 2000, when George W. Bush resigned ahead of being sworn-in as President of the United States, has announced that he will not run for a fourth full term as Governor. This will be the first open election for Governor since 1990, when Ann Richards was elected.

Greg Abbott won the Republican primary, Wendy Davis won the Democratic primary. Kathie Glass won the Libertarian Party of Texas nomination in convention. They and a Green candidate will contest the general election.

Abbott won the general election, defeating Davis by twenty points.

Lieutenant Governor[edit]

Incumbent Republican Lieutenant Governor David Dewhurst ran for re-election to an unprecedented fourth term in office.

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared
Declined

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
David
Dewhurst
Dan
Branch
Susan
Combs
Ed
Emmett
Dan
Patrick
Jerry
Patterson
Todd
Staples
Other Undecided
UoT/Texas Tribune February 7–17, 2014 461 ± 4.56% 37% 31% 17% 15%
Public Policy Polling November 1–4, 2013 388 ± 5% 37% 18% 10% 4% 31%
UoT/Texas Tribune October 18–27, 2013 519 ± 5.02% 26% 13% 10% 5% 46%
Public Policy Polling June 28–July 1, 2013 318 ± ? 37% 17% 7% 5% 34%
UoT/Texas Tribune May 31–June 9, 2013 492 ± 5.27% 19% 10% 6% 5% 61%
Public Policy Polling January 24–27, 2013 400 ± ? 37% 18% 12% 2% 4% 26%
University of Texas-Austin May 7–13, 2012 343 ± 5.29% 3% 29% 23% 9% 10% 22% 4%
DWBS April 27–30, 2012 400 ± 4.5% 2% 28% 5% 15% 5% 7% 39%
University of Texas-Austin February 8–15, 2012 361 ± 5.16% 3% 27% 20% 8% 8% 34%
University of Texas-Austin October 19–26, 2011 397 ± 4.92% 1% 14% 9% 5% 2% 5% 64%

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Dan Patrick 552,692 41.43%
Republican David Dewhurst 377,856 28.32%
Republican Todd Staples 236,949 17.76%
Republican Jerry Patterson 166,399 12.47%
Totals 1,333,896 100%

Runoff[edit]

Polling
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
David
Dewhurst
Dan
Patrick
Other Undecided
Baselice & Associates March 5–6, 2014 501 ± 4.4% 34% 55% 11%
Results
Republican primary runoff results[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Dan Patrick 487,829 65.05%
Republican David Dewhurst 262,086 34.95%
Totals 749,915 100%

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared
Withdrew

Libertarian nomination[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared
  • Brandon de Hoyos, journalist[11]
Withdrew

Green nomination[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared

General election[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Dan
Patrick (R)
Leticia
Van de Putte (D)
Other Undecided
UoT/Texas Tribune October 10–19, 2014 866 ± 3.6% 52% 35% 13%[12]
Survey Research Center September 22–October 16, 2014 781 ± 3.5% 36% 24% 6%[13] 34%
Crosswind Communications October 9–12, 2014 500 ± 4.33% 42.8% 23% 1.2% 33%
Texas Lyceum September 11–25, 2014 666 ± 3.8% 47% 33% 5%[14] 14%
UoT/Texas Tribune May 30–June 8, 2014 1,200 ± 2.83% 41% 26% 9%[15] 23%
Public Policy Polling April 10–13, 2014 559 ± 4.1% 51% 35% 14%
UoT/Texas Tribune February 7–17, 2014 1,200 ± 2.83% 41% 32% 28%

Results[edit]

Texas lieutenant gubernatorial election, 2014[16]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Dan Patrick 2,718,406 58.13%
Democratic Leticia Van de Putte 1,810,720 38.72%
Libertarian Robert Butler 119,581 2.55%
Green Chandra Courtney 27,651 0.59%
Majority 907,686 19.41%
Totals 4,676,358 100%
Voter turnout 33.34%
Republican hold

Attorney General[edit]

Incumbent Republican Attorney General Greg Abbott did not running for re-election to a fourth term. He is instead the Republican nominee for Governor.

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared
Declined

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Dan
Branch
Ken
Paxton
Barry
Smitherman
Other Undecided
UoT/Texas Tribune February 7–17, 2014 461 ± 4.56% 42% 38% 20%
UoT/Texas Tribune October 18–27, 2013 519 ± 5.02% 5% 10% 11% 74%

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ken Paxton 569,034 44.45%
Republican Dan Branch 428,325 33.46%
Republican Barry Smitherman 282,701 22.08%
Totals 1,280,060 100%

Runoff[edit]

Results
Republican primary runoff results[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ken Paxton 466,224 63.63%
Republican Dan Branch 266,539 36.37%
Totals 732,763 100%

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared

Libertarian nomination[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared

Balagia won the Libertarian nomination

Green nomination[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared

General election[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Ken
Paxton (R)
Sam
Houston (D)
Other Undecided
UoT/Texas Tribune October 10–19, 2014 866 ± 3.6% 54% 34% 12%[22]
UoT/Texas Tribune May 30–June 8, 2014 1,200 ± 2.83% 40% 27% 6%[23] 27%

Results[edit]

Texas Attorney General election, 2014[16]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ken Paxton 2,737,289 58.8%
Democratic Sam Houston 1,769,943 38.02%
Libertarian Jamie Balagia 118,183 2.53%
Green Jamar Osborne 29,513 0.63%
Majority 967,346 20.78%
Totals 4,654,928 100%
Voter turnout 33.18%
Republican hold

Comptroller of Public Accounts[edit]

Incumbent Republican Comptroller Susan Combs is retiring and will not seek a third term in office.

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared
Declined

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Glenn
Hegar
Harvey
Hilderbran
Debra
Medina
Raul
Torres
Other Undecided
UoT/Texas Tribune February 7–17, 2014 461 ±4.56% 24% 26% 39% 11%
UoT/Texas Tribune October 18–27, 2013 519 ±5.02% 4% 2% 14% 5% 75%

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Glenn Hegar 612,269 49.99%
Republican Harvey Hilderbran 318,899 26.04%
Republican Debra Medina 236,531 19.31%
Republican Raul Torres 56,937 4.64%
Totals 1,224,636 100%

A runoff was to be held, but with Hegar only narrowly below the 50% threshold and with several thousand provisional and overseas ballots to be counted, Hildebran withdrew on March 7, 2014, and endorsed Hegar.[28] When the final results were released, Hegar had come only 50 votes short of winning the primary outright.

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared
  • Mike Collier, businessman and accountant[29]

Libertarian nomination[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared

Green nomination[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared

General election[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Glenn
Hegar (R)
Mike
Collier (D)
Other Undecided
UoT/Texas Tribune October 10–19, 2014 866 ± 3.6% 49% 34% 17%[30]
UoT/Texas Tribune May 30–June 8, 2014 1,200 ± 2.83% 32% 25% 7%[31] 37%

Results[edit]

Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts election, 2014[16]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Glenn Hegar 2,692,803 58.36%
Democratic Mike Collier 1,739,308 37.69%
Libertarian Ben Sanders 136,969 2.96%
Green Deb Shafto 44,924 0.97%
Majority 953,495 20.67%
Totals 4,614,004 100%
Voter turnout 32.89%
Republican hold

Commissioner of the General Land Office[edit]

Incumbent Republican Commissioner Jerry E. Patterson did not running for re-election to a fourth term. He instead ran unsuccessfully for Lieutenant Governor.

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared
Declined

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican George P. Bush 937,987 72.99%
Republican David Watts 346,949 27%
Totals 1,284,936 100%

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared

Libertarian nomination[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared
Withdrew

Knight won the Libertarian nomination

Green nomination[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared
  • Ulises Cabrera[10]

General election[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
George P.
Bush (R)
John
Cook (D)
Other Undecided
UoT/Texas Tribune October 10–19, 2014 866 ± 3.6% 50% 32% 17%[35]
UoT/Texas Tribune May 30–June 8, 2014 1,200 ± 2.83% 36% 25% 9%[36] 30%
Public Policy Polling April 10–13, 2014 559 ± 4.1% 50% 32% 18%

Results[edit]

Texas Commissioner of the General Land Office election, 2014[16]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican George P. Bush 2,821,359 60.68%
Democratic John Cook 1,641,858 35.31%
Libertarian Justin Knight 126,203 2.71%
Green Valerie Alessi 59,992 1.29%
Majority 1,179,501 25.37%
Totals 4,649,412 100%
Voter turnout 33.14%
Republican hold

Commissioner of Agriculture[edit]

Incumbent Republican Commissioner Todd Staples did not running for re-election to a third term. He instead ran unsuccessfully for Lieutenant Governor. On September 18, he announced that he would resign within the next two months, to become President of the Texas Oil and Gas Association.[37]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared
Withdrew
Declined

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Sid Miller 411,560 34.56%
Republican Tommy Merritt 249,440 20.94%
Republican Eric Opiela 207,222 17.40%
Republican Joe Cotten 174,348 14.64%
Republican J. Allen Carnes 148,222 12.44%
Totals 1,190,792 100%

Runoff[edit]

Results
Republican primary runoff results[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Sid Miller 362,573 53.08%
Republican Tommy Merritt 320,434 46.92%
Totals 683,007 100%

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared

Results[edit]

Democratic primary results[46]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jim Hogan 190,090 38.74%
Democratic Kinky Friedman 185,180 37.74%
Democratic Hugh Fitzsimons 115,395 23.51%
Totals 490,665 100%

Runoff[edit]

Results
Democratic primary runoff results[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jim Hogan 105,763 53.71%
Democratic Kinky Friedman 91,154 46.29%
Totals 196,917 100%

Libertarian nomination[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared
  • Rick Donaldson[10]
  • David "Rocky" Palmquist, rancher[11]

Palmquist won the Libertarian nomination.

Green nomination[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared
  • Kenneth Kendrick, food safety advocate and whistleblower[10]

General election[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Sid
Miller (R)
Jim
Hogan (D)
Other Undecided
UoT/Texas Tribune October 10–19, 2014 866 ± 3.6% 47% 35% 18%[47]
UoT/Texas Tribune May 30–June 8, 2014 1,200 ± 2.83% 32% 24% 9%[48] 34%

Results[edit]

Texas Commissioner of Agriculture election, 2014[16]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Sid Miller 2,693,466 58.58%
Democratic Jim Hogan 1,694,059 36.84%
Libertarian David "Rocky" Palmquist 132,299 2.87%
Green Kenneth Kendrick 77,416 1.68%
Majority 999,407 21.74%
Totals 4,597,240 100%
Voter turnout 32.77%
Republican hold

Railroad Commissioner[edit]

Incumbent Republican Commissioner Barry Smitherman did not run for re-election to a full term. He instead ran unsuccessfully for Attorney General.

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared
  • Becky Berger, geologist and candidate for the Railroad Commission in 2012[49]
  • Malachi Boyuls, attorney and venture capitalist[50]
  • Wayne Christian, former State Representative[51]
  • Ryan Sitton, oil and gas engineer and candidate for the Texas House of Representatives in 2012[52]
Withdrew
Declined

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Wayne Christian 503,634 42.68%
Republican Ryan Sitton 360,125 30.52%
Republican Becky Berger 198,672 16.83%
Republican Malachi Boyuls 117,511 9.95%
Totals 1,179,942 100%

Runoff[edit]

Results
Republican primary runoff results[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ryan Sitton 398,652 57.25%
Republican Wayne Christian 297,654 42.75%
Totals 696,306 100%

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared
  • Steve Brown, former Chairman of the Fort Bend County Democratic Party[55]
  • Dale Henry, perennial candidate

Results[edit]

Democratic primary results[46]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Steve Brown 299,009 64.02%
Democratic Dale Henry 168,036 35.97%
Totals 467,045 100%

Libertarian nomination[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared
  • Jason Kute[10]
  • Mark Miller, businessman[11]

Miller won the Libertarian nomination.

Green nomination[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared
  • Martina Salinas[10]

General election[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Ryan
Sitton (R)
Steve
Brown (D)
Other Undecided
UoT/Texas Tribune October 10–19, 2014 866 ± 3.6% 48% 34% 19%[56]
UoT/Texas Tribune May 30–June 8, 2014 1,200 ± 2.83% 32% 24% 10%[57] 33%

Results[edit]

Texas Railroad Commissioner election, 2014[16]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ryan Sitton 2,679,537 58.27%
Democratic Steve Brown 1,679,658 36.52%
Libertarian Mark Miller 145,127 3.15%
Green Kenneth Kendrick 93,988 2.04%
Majority 999,879 21.74%
Totals 4,598,310 100%
Voter turnout 32.78%
Republican hold

United States Senate[edit]

Incumbent Republican Senator and Senate Minority Whip John Cornyn is running for re-election to a third term.[58] He won the Republican primary with 59% of the vote, easily turning back a primary challenge from U.S. Representative Steve Stockman and six others. The Democratic primary went to a runoff after businessman David Alameel took 47% of the vote and Worldwide LaRouche Youth Movement activist Kesha Rogers took 22% of the vote. Alameel easily defeated Rogers.

In the general election, Cornyn defeated Alameel in a landslide.

United States House of Representatives[edit]

All of Texas' thirty-six seats in the United States House of Representatives were up for election in 2014.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "David Dewhurst, Texas Lieutenant Governor, Launches Reelection Bid". Independent Political Report. August 7, 2013. Retrieved November 24, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Coming Out Swinging, Dan Patrick Announces for Lt. Gov.". The Texas Tribune. June 27, 2013. Retrieved November 24, 2013. 
  3. ^ a b "Texas Land Commissioner Jerry Patterson Wants 4 States Out of U.S.". 5nbcdfw. October 11, 2013. Retrieved November 24, 2013. 
  4. ^ a b "TEXAS LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR CANDIDATE TODD STAPLES EXPLAINS SUPPORT OF PROPOSITION 6 AND HIS VOTE ON DPS ID BILL [AUDIO]". KYFO. October 23, 2013. Retrieved November 24, 2013. 
  5. ^ a b "Susan Combs to Retire; 2014 Dominoes to Fall Without Rick Perry Decision". Burnt Orange Report. May 30, 2013. Retrieved November 24, 2013. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f http://elections.sos.state.tx.us/elchist.exe 2014 Republican Party Primary Election
  7. ^ a b c d e "Texas - Summary Vote Results". Associated Press. May 28, 2014. Retrieved May 29, 2014. 
  8. ^ "Leticia Van de Putte Announces Bid For Texas Lieutenant Governor". The Huffington Post. November 23, 2013. Retrieved November 24, 2013. 
  9. ^ "DEMOCRAT LT. GOVERNOR CANDIDATE MARIA LUISA ALVARADO TO HOLD LUBBOCK MEET AND GREET". KYFO. November 22, 2013. Retrieved November 24, 2013. 
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q "2014 Texas Statewide Candidates". Burnt Orange Report. Retrieved October 5, 2013. 
  11. ^ a b c d e f "Libertarian Kathie Glass Announces Bid for Governor". The Texas Tribune. June 26, 2013. Retrieved October 5, 2013. 
  12. ^ Robert Butler (L) 9%, Chandra Courtney (G) 4%
  13. ^ Robert Butler (L) 1.8%, Chandra Courtney (G) 0.9%, Other 3.3%
  14. ^ Robert Butler (L) 3%, Chandra Courtney (G) 2%
  15. ^ Robert Butler (L) 4%, Chandra Courtney (G) 1%, Other 4%
  16. ^ a b c d e f "Office of the Secretary of State 2014 General Election Election Night Returns". Texas Secretary of State. Retrieved November 30, 2014. 
  17. ^ "Cruz to the finish line? Dallas Rep. Dan Branch joins Texas attorney general race". Dallas Culture Map. November 13, 2013. Retrieved November 24, 2013. 
  18. ^ "Republican Attorney General Candidate Ken Paxton Eats With Racist Blog's Owner". Burnt Orange Report. November 22, 2013. Retrieved November 24, 2013. 
  19. ^ a b "Texas AG Candidate Barry Smitherman Can Shoot All the Guns". Dallas Observer. November 20, 2013. Retrieved November 24, 2013. 
  20. ^ Hoppe, Christy (July 14, 2013). "Greg Abbott makes it official: He’s running for governor of Texas". Retrieved July 15, 2013. 
  21. ^ "Attorney Sam Houston files for attorney general". My Fox Houston. November 22, 2013. Retrieved November 24, 2013. 
  22. ^ Jamie Balagia (L) 8%, Jamar Osborne (G) 4%
  23. ^ Jamie Balagia (L) 3%, Jamar Osborne (G) 3%
  24. ^ "Comptroller candidates pounce on Combs’ endorsement of Hegar". Houston Chronicle. October 22, 2013. Retrieved November 24, 2013. 
  25. ^ "Rep. Harvey Hilderbran announces bid for comptroller". Dallas Morning News. September 19, 2013. Retrieved November 24, 2013. 
  26. ^ "Tea party activist Medina to run for Texas comptroller". Dallas Morning News. November 13, 2013. Retrieved November 24, 2013. 
  27. ^ "Raul Torres Launches Campaign for Texas Comptroller". Texas Inside. August 29, 2013. Retrieved November 24, 2013. 
  28. ^ "Kate Alexander, "Glenn Hegar wins GOP comptroller primary after Harvey Hilderbran bows out of runoff"". Austin American-Statesman. Retrieved March 7, 2014. 
  29. ^ "Democrat Collier enters race for Texas comptroller". Dallas Morning News. October 7, 2013. Retrieved November 24, 2013. 
  30. ^ Ben Sanders (L) 11%, Deb Shafto (G) 6%
  31. ^ Ben Sanders (L) 5%, Deb Shafto (G) 2%
  32. ^ "George P. Bush formally files to run for Texas land commissioner". Dallas Morning News. November 19, 2013. Retrieved November 24, 2013. 
  33. ^ "REPUBLICAN TEXAS LAND COMMISSIONER CANDIDATE DAVID WATTS TO VISIT LUBBOCK". KYFO. July 1, 2013. Retrieved November 24, 2013. 
  34. ^ "Candidate Filing Roundup; Sen. Wendy Davis and General Greg Abbott to Face Primary Challengers". Burnt Orange Report. November 10, 2013. Retrieved November 24, 2013. 
  35. ^ Justin Knight (L) 10%, Valerie Alessi (G) 7%
  36. ^ Justin Knight (L) 6%, Valerie Alessi (G) 3%
  37. ^ "Texas agriculture commissioner to resign". Star Tribune. September 19, 2014. Retrieved October 2, 2014. 
  38. ^ "Uvalde mayor, J. Allen Carnes, makes bid for agriculture commissioner official". Dallas Morning News. September 5, 2013. Retrieved November 24, 2013. 
  39. ^ "Republican candidate for Texas agricultural commissioner talks industry growth". Texas Chronicle. December 11, 2013. Retrieved February 14, 2014. 
  40. ^ "Former Rep. Tommy Merritt entering race for Ag Commissioner". Dallas Morning News. October 18, 2013. Retrieved November 24, 2013. 
  41. ^ a b "Shake-up in race for Texas Ag Commissioner". The Houston Chronicle. October 17, 2013. Retrieved November 24, 2013. 
  42. ^ "Texas agriculture commissioner candidate Eric Opiela focuses on water, rights". The Washington Examiner. October 26, 2013. Retrieved November 24, 2013. 
  43. ^ "For Ag commissioner". The Houston Chronicle. January 31, 2014. Retrieved February 14, 2014. 
  44. ^ "Kinky Friedman running for agriculture commissioner". The Houston Chronicle. October 15, 2013. Retrieved November 24, 2013. 
  45. ^ "Statewide Candidate Filings Trickle In". The Austin Chronicle. November 22, 2013. Retrieved November 24, 2013. 
  46. ^ a b http://elections.sos.state.tx.us/elchist.exe 2014 Democratic Party Primary Election
  47. ^ Kenneth Kendrick (G) 9%, Rocky Palmquist (L) 9%
  48. ^ Kenneth Kendrick (G) 5%, Rocky Palmquist (L) 4%
  49. ^ "Railroad Commission candidates hit campaign trail". My West Texas. July 17, 2013. Retrieved November 24, 2013. 
  50. ^ "MALACHI BOYULS SAYS "FREE MARKET PRINCIPLES" MUST PLAY ROLE IN REGULATION FROM TEXAS RAILROAD COMMISSION [AUDIO]". KYFO. August 7, 2013. Retrieved November 24, 2013. 
  51. ^ "Texas Digest: Wayne Christian announces for railroad commissioner; feds nix Texas waiver to reduce tests for high-performing students". statesman.com. September 9, 2013. Retrieved November 24, 2013. 
  52. ^ a b "Will Texas Railroad Commission Race Draw Attention?". My High Plains. September 25, 2013. Retrieved November 24, 2013. 
  53. ^ "State lawmaker drops out of Railroad Commission race". The Houston Chronicle. October 22, 2013. Retrieved November 24, 2013. 
  54. ^ "Former state Rep. Ray Keller announces for RR Commissioner". The Dallas Morning News. July 23, 2013. Retrieved November 24, 2013. 
  55. ^ "Steve Brown to Run for Railroad Commissioner". The Texas Tribune. November 8, 2013. Retrieved November 24, 2013. 
  56. ^ Mark Miller (L) 10%, Martina Salinas (G) 9%
  57. ^ Mark Miller (L) 6%, Martina Salinas (G) 4%
  58. ^ "John Cornyn Airs First Re-Election Campaign Spot". Roll Call. October 7, 2013. Retrieved November 24, 2013. 

External links[edit]