Théâtre de l'Atelier

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Théâtre de l'Atelier
Théâtre de Montmartre
Théâtre de l'Atelier (mars 2010).JPG
Façade of the Théâtre de l'Atelier
Address 1, place Charles Dullin, 18th. Paris
Paris
Coordinates 48°53′00″N 2°20′32″E / 48.8834°N 2.3423°E / 48.8834; 2.3423
Capacity 563
Opened 1822
Website
theatre-atelier.com

The Théâtre de l'Atelier is a theatre at 1, place Charles Dullin in the 18th arrondissement of Paris.

History[edit]

The theatre opened on 23 November 1822 under the name Théâtre Montmartre[1] It was one of the first built by Pierre-Jacques Seveste, who held the licence to operate theatres outside the town limits of Paris, and who also built the Théâtre Montparnasse, the Théâtre des Batignolles and the Théâtre de Belleville.[2] Peter Cicéri and Évariste Fragonard did the decoration.

On the death of their parents, brothers Jules Sevestre and Edmond Sevestre inherited the licence to operate the theatre.

From 1914 to 1922, the building comprised a cinema of six hundred seats, operated under the name "Montmartre." In 1922, it returned to its original purpose, and its director and actor Charles Dullin renamed it the Théâtre de l'Atelier.[1]

André Barsacq succeeded Dullin, and led the theatre from 1940 to 1973. He produced works of Jean Anouilh, Marcel Ayme, Françoise Sagan, René de Obaldia, and Friedrich Dürrenmatt—among others.

From 1974 to 1976 leadership was shared among Peter Franck, Michael Fagadau, Loïc Volard, and Jean-Claude Houdiniere.

From 1976 until December 1998, Pierre Franck took over along with his wife Danielle Frank. He continued his work as director and maintained high standards in the choice of repertoire with works by Pirandello, Ionesco, Beckett, Thomas Bernhard, Strindberg—and with actors such as Michel Bouquet and Laurent Terzieff.

Laura Pels assumed the leadership in January 1999.[3]

The current capacity is five hundred and sixty-three seats. The theatre was classified a historical monument on 22 March 1965.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Edward Foreman, Historical dictionary of French theater, U.K.: Scarecrow Press, 2010 p. 31.
  2. ^ Théâtre de Belleville website page[dead link]
  3. ^ Laura Pels Biography from the Théâtre de l'Atelier
  4. ^ Historical monuments and protected buildings in 18th arrondissement of Paris (in French) from annuaire-mairie.fr

External links[edit]