Thalia Theater (Hamburg)

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Thalia Theater
Hamburg.Thalia.jpg
Thalia Theater front view.
Address Alstertor 2
Hamburg
Germany
Owner Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg
Opened 1843
Website
http://www.thalia-theater.de/

The Thalia Theater is one of the three state-owned theatres in Hamburg, Germany. It was founded in 1843 by Charles Maurice Schwartzenberger and named after the muse Thalia. Today, it is home to one of Germany's most famous ensembles and stages around 9 new plays per season. Current theatre manager is Ulrich Khuon.

In addition to its main building, located in the street Raboisen in the quarter Hamburg-Altstadt near the Binnenalster in Hamburg's inner city, the theatre operates a smaller stage, used for experimental plays, the Thalia in der Gaußstraße, located in the borough of Altona.

Plays[edit]

In October 1991 Ruth Berghaus directed Bertolt Brecht's In The Jungle of Cities (German: Im Dickicht der Städte) as part of a series of 'related texts', as she called them (which also included Büchner's Danton's Death).[1]

Performed by the ensemble in 2006[edit]

Thalia Theater
Thalia in der Gaußstraße

Performed by the theatre's ensemble in 2006

  • Café Umberto by Moritz Rinke
  • Zeit zu Lieben Zeit zu Sterben by Fritz Kater
  • Dies ist kein Liebeslied by Karen Duve
  • Das Ende vom Anfang by Sean O'Casey
  • Antigone by Sophocles
  • Liebesruh by Jan Neumann
  • Bartleby, der Schreiber by Herman Melville
  • Sauerstoff by Iwan Wyrypajew
  • Norway.Today by Igor Bauersima
  • WE ARE CAMERA/JASONMATERIAL by Fritz Kater
  • Limited Edition: Das Wunder von St. Georg by Peer Paul Gustavsson
  • Ware Liebe
  • Hinter euren Zäunen
  • Durchgebrannt by Ursula Rani Sarma
  • Kick & Rush by Andri Beyeler
  • Abalon, One Nite in Bangkok by Fritz Kater
  • Z by Nino Haratischwili
  • Mein Kampf by George Tabori

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Meech (1994, 54).

References[edit]

  • Meech, Tony. 1994. "Brecht's Early Plays." In Thomson and Sacks (1994, 43–55).
    • Thomson, Peter and Glendyr Sacks, eds. 1994. The Cambridge Companion to Brecht. Cambridge Companions to Literature Ser. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-41446-6.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 53°33′10″N 9°59′49″E / 53.55278°N 9.99694°E / 53.55278; 9.99694