Max Wallace

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Max Wallace
Max Wallace 01.jpg
Born Maxwell Wallace
United States
Occupation Writer, filmmaker human rights activist
Language English
Nationality Canadian
Ethnicity Caucasian
Citizenship Canadian
Education University
Period present
Genre non-fiction

Max Wallace is a Canadian journalist, filmmaker and human rights activist.

Literary works[edit]

Who Killed Kurt Cobain?[edit]

Wallace coauthored the international bestseller Who Killed Kurt Cobain? with Ian Halperin in 1998, (described as a "judicious presentation of explosive material" by The New Yorker).

Love and Death: The Murder of Kurt Cobain[edit]

Published in 2004, Wallace wrote Love and Death: The Murder of Kurt Cobain with Halperin,[1] which reached the New York Times bestseller list.

The American Axis: Henry Ford, Charles Lindbergh and the Rise of the Third Reich[edit]

This work, about the Nazi sympathies of two American icons, received a cover endorsement by two-time Pulitzer-prize winning historian Arthur Schlesinger Jr..

Muhammad Ali's Greatest Fight: Cassius Clay vs. the United States of America[edit]

Written in 2000, this book covers Muhammad Ali's long battle against the US government over his stand against the Vietnam War. Ali wrote the foreword. In 2013, the book was adapted into a movie directed by two-time Oscar nominee Stephen Frears, starring Danny Glover, Christopher Plummer and Frank Langella. The film premiered at the Cannes Film Festival on May 23, 2013.

Film[edit]

Wallace is also a documentary filmmaker whose first film, Too Colorful for the League, about the history of racism in hockey for CBC TV, was nominated for a Gemini Award. Wallace has also contributed to the BBC and the Sunday New York Times. His second film, Schmelvis, had a US theatrical release and played in more than 75 film festivals around the world. In the 1990s, Wallace co-founded both the Ottawa Folk Festival and the Ottawa International Busker Festival when employed as station manager for CKCU-FM, Canada's largest community radio station.

In the 1990s, he worked for several years with Steven Spielberg's Shoah Foundation, recording the video testimonies of Holocaust survivors.

Activism[edit]

Wallace was a prominent activist in the anti-Apartheid and peace movements and has worked with two Nobel Peace Prize winners on international human rights causes, and with Ralph Nader founding the Quebec Public Interest Research Group in the 1980s. He is currently active in issues around food security, affordable housing, and environmental education. He continues to promote the International Victory Gardens Network ("Plant a Victory Garden, help win the war against hunger") that he started in 2001, helping to bring urban agriculture and food security to marginalized and socially isolated communities throughout the world in the spirit of the World War II victory gardens which helped the Allies win the war. In 2009, he won the David Suzuki Foundation's "David Suzuki Digs My Garden" contest for best organic ornamental garden in Canada. He is also Parliamentary Liaison of the Drop the Fee Campaign, aiming to eliminate the Refugee Processing Fee that serves as a barrier to countless immigrants and refugees in Canada.

Published works[edit]

  • Who Killed Kurt Cobain? with Ian Halperin in 1998
  • Muhammad Ali's Greatest Fight: Cassius Clay vs. the United States of America (M. Evans & Co., 2000)
  • The American Axis: Ford, Lindbergh, and the Rise of the Third Reich (St. Martin's Press, 2003)
  • Love & Death: The Murder of Kurt Cobain with Ian Halperin (Simon & Schuster, 2004)

Awards[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]