The Baffler

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The Baffler
Editor John Summers
Frequency Triannual
Founder Thomas Frank and Keith White
First issue  1988 (1988-month)
Company MIT Press
Country United States
Language English
Website thebaffler.com
The Baffler at MIT Press
ISSN 1059-9789
OCLC number 24838556

The Baffler is a magazine of cultural, political, and business criticism that was established in 1988 and published until the spring of 2007. It was revived in 2009,[1] with the first issue of volume 2 published in January 2010. The magazine was headquartered in Chicago, Illinois and sold at bookstores across the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom.

History[edit]

Established in 1988 by editors Thomas Frank and Keith White, published by Greg Lane, The Baffler had up to 12,000 subscribers.[2] A self-described goal was to be "the journal that blunts the cutting edge".[3] It was known for critiquing "business culture and the culture business"[4] and for having exposed the grunge speak hoax perpetrated on the New York Times.[5] One famous and much-republished article, "The Problem with Music" by Steve Albini, exposed the inner-workings of the music business during the indie rock heyday.[6]

The magazine is credited with having helped launch the careers of several writers, including: Thomas Frank (What's the Matter with Kansas?), Ana Marie Cox of Wonkette, and Rick Perlstein (Nixonland).[3]

Issues[edit]

The magazine published sporadically, especially after the Chicago office of the Baffler was destroyed in a fire[7] on April 25, 2001. (Baffler 14 was in press at the time, and only three new issues were subsequently published.)

Timeline of The Baffler magazine:[8] #1 (1988), #2 (1990), #3 (1991), #4 (1992), #5 (1993), #6–7 (1995), #8 (1996), #9–11 (1997), #12–13 (1999), #14 (2001), #15–16 (2003), #17 (2006).

Relaunch[edit]

On June 23, 2009 the New York Observer reported that founding editor Thomas Frank decided to revive the magazine.[1] The magazine was relaunched in 2010, under a new publisher and new editors, and with a new design, with volume 2, issue 1 published in Winter, 2010.

The Baffler is sold through many different distribution channels, both as a book and as a magazine; in addition to the publication's ISSN, all but the earliest issues have an individual ISBN.

In October 2011, the new editor, John Summers, signed a 5-year publishing contract with the MIT Press.[2]

Collections[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Leon Nefaykh (June 24, 2009). "Color Me Baffled! Thomas Frank's Magazine Lives Again". New York Observer. p. 10. Retrieved 2014-07-30. 
  2. ^ a b Peter Monaghan (October 26, 2011). "‘The Baffler’ Will Reappear via MIT Press". The Chronicle of Higher Education. Retrieved 2014-07-30. 
  3. ^ a b Jennifer Schuessler (July 21, 2014). "The Baffler Puts Its Archive Online". New York Times. Retrieved 2014-07-30. 
  4. ^ Elizabeth Taylor (January 11, 1998). "Mixing Business With Culture". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 2014-07-30. 
  5. ^ Leon Nefaykh (August 14, 2009). "Remember the Grunge Hoax?". New York Observer. Retrieved 2014-07-30. 
  6. ^ Albini, Steve (1993), The Problem with Music, The Baffler (Chicago: Thomas Frank) (5), ISSN 1059-9789, OCLC 24838556, archived from the original on 2007-09-28 , also archived from the dead Baffler site. (Reprinted in Maximum RocknRoll #133 (June 1994) and later various websites.)
  7. ^ Ron Charles (July 21, 2014). "A quarter century of the Baffler". Washington Post. Retrieved 2014-07-30. 
  8. ^ Timeline checked with BookFinder plus WorldCat, consolidated with various sources, including DustyGroove, BookMaps, LibraryThing.

External links[edit]